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COVID-19 Alert Level 2 – Parks and facilities information

Under Alert Level 2, all public toilets, playgrounds, basketball courts, tennis courts, golf clubs, skate parks, pump tracks, BBQs and other facilities within our parks and open spaces will reopen to the public. 

Aucklanders planning to use these facilities should wash or sanitise their hands before and after use, and keep two metres away from other users. Do not use these facilities or equipment if you are feeling unwell. Where safe physical distancing may not be possible, the use of a face mask is recommended.

Use the NZ COVID Tracer app to manually record your visit to our parks, beaches, toilets and open spaces. Follow the latest government advice on covid19.govt.nz.

Alan Wood Reserve Path

Walking time 40 mins

Walking steps 3510 steps

Cycling time 20 mins

Distance 2.7 km

Starts at 16 Brydon Place, New Windsor

Get directions on Google Maps

About the path

A wide shared path through Alan Wood Reserve in Mount Albert, with plenty of space and activities for family adventures.

The path is well sign-posted and is great for walking, cycling and children riding bikes and scooters.

Start at Brydon Place in New Windsor, where you'll find a small toddlers' playground.

From here turn left and follow the path to the northern end of the reserve. Catch a glimpse of the motorway tunnel entrance. You'll see spectacular panels of concrete art depicting a Māori legend of two lovers, Hinemairangi and Tamaireia, who escaped underground.

Turn around at the northern end of the reserve, and continue along the pathway to the south. You'll pass along Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek), one of Auckland's longest urban streams.

You'll pass:

  1. Mokomoko Bridge (named after the native copper skinks found in the area)
  2. Tuna Roa Bridge (referring to the shape of the park being similar to that of the protected Longfin eel)
  3. Raupō Bridge (named after the bulrushes — large-grass like plants commonly found in wetlands).

Approximately 74,000 natives were planted in the Valonia Wetland Reserve. Some include flax and long grasses, tōtara and kahikatea. These provide a habitat for pied stilts, ducks, pūkeko and other birds.

Venture over the iconic arch bridge of Te Whitinga (The Crossing) which spans State Highway 20 at the southern end of the Waterview tunnels.

Check out the great recreation activities around Kūkūwai Park and Valonia Reserve. Throw a ball around, kick a few goals or take advantage of the sand-turf pitches and volleyball court. Intermediate and advanced level skaters will love the rails, bowls, boxes and terraces at Valonia Reserve skatepark.

Public toilets are available here.

From here, continue back to the start or continue on to another great connecting walk around Mt Albert.

Facilities

  • Basketball court
  • Playground
  • Skate park
  • Sports field

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