Annual Budget 2017/2018

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Annual Budget 2017/2018

Consultation document

Message from the Mayor

Auckland’s growth is a sign of its success. People want to live in a city which is beautiful, diverse, interesting and offers lots of opportunities.

But there is a downside to such rapid growth. With the city increasing by nearly 900 more residents a week, this has outpaced growth in infrastructure for housing and transport. It has caused housing unaffordability and traffic congestion.

We need desperately to invest more in infrastructure but the burden should not just fall on our ratepayers. I want to keep rate increases low and reasonable.

In this Budget, I want to share the cost of growth more fairly across those who benefit from it.

In my view, rate rises should be no higher than 2.5%. I am working to broaden our revenue base through measures such as a targeted rate on accommodation providers, and a targeted rate for new large scale developments. We need to also address growing social problems like homelessness and our own low paid staff who are struggling to afford to live in our city.

There are different views around the Council table on some of these issues. However, all Councillors agree that these are important questions and want Auckland residents to have a say on them. We are putting out this budget for consultation so we can hear your views of our proposals. Your input helps us reach the best decision about how to make our city better.

Phil Goff - Mayor of Auckland

 

About this document

Once every three years, councils adopt a long-term plan (10-year budget), and in the intervening years an annual plan, otherwise known as an annual budget. Each year our budget sets rates for the year and includes a Local Board Agreement for each of our 21 local boards.

Parts of this document

Part One: Introduction

Part Two: What we want your feedback on

Part Three: Other changes and budget information for 2017/2018

Part Four: Give us your views

Part one: Introduction

Auckland’s rapid growth is the most significant factor influencing Auckland Council’s budget. More people and houses create additional demand for public transport, roads, water, sewerage, parks and community facilities, along with all the other services the council provides.

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The average general rates increase is proposed at 2.5 per cent for 2017/2018.

Aucklanders have told us that we need to keep rates affordable and find fairer ways to cover our costs.

While we are having some constructive conversations with central government about new ways to raise funds, doing things differently can take some time. In the meantime, we are considering how we can better use the tools we already have. Two key examples are:

Our 10-year budget, prepared a couple of years ago, included a general rates increase of 3.5 per cent in 2017/2018. We are now reviewing that and new information indicates that we could reduce this increase.

We will also look to find further efficiencies to help keep rates low and to offset the costs of things like ensuring a fair wage for all council staff and coordinating collaboration on homelessness.

In recent years the transition to one rating policy across Auckland has resulted in large variations in rates for many Aucklanders. Our focus this year is on stability so we are looking to ensure all ratepayers receive the same percentage rate increase.

This consultation document seeks your input to help us develop our annual budget for 2017/2018.

 

Part two: What we want your feedback on

Issues 1: Rates increase

Based on an assumption of further success in keeping costs low, we had previously projected that an average rates increase of 3.5 per cent would be needed for 2017/2018 to deliver our planned investments and services.

The latest review of our budgets has identified additional savings (primarily related to inflation, interest costs and the timing of capital projects) that will allow us to deliver the same things for about $15 million less. This $15 million of savings could be used to reduce the rates increase for 2017/2018 from 3.5 per cent to 2.5 per cent. Any further revenue reductions would put our AA Standard and Poor’s credit rating at risk, result in higher interest costs in the future and require decisions about reducing investment or services.

Options

Option A: Retain the previously planned 3.5 per cent average rates increase

Option B: Use the identified savings to reduce the average rates increase to 2.5 per cent.

Option C: Reduce some investments or services to achieve rates increase

In 2017/2018 we are planning to spend $1.4 billion on building new assets to support Auckland’s rapid growth and deal with existing problems like traffic congestion. We will also spend $2.4 billion delivering a wide range of day-to-day services to Aucklanders. While inflation is one driver of our budgets, the bigger issue is the pressure of population growth and the additional assets and expanded services that this brings.

To keep rates as affordable as possible, we have been working hard to deliver these assets and services at the lowest possible cost. As shown in the following graph, our record for keeping costs down compares favourably with the other major growth centres in New Zealand.

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Core operating expenditure, annual growth rate from 2012 to 2016 is 1.8 per cent for Auckland Council compared to 4.2 per cent for other major growth centres (excluding Christchurch).

The council seeks to balance its budget every year. In broad terms, we use rates, fees and charges (revenue) to pay for the services we deliver and we borrow money (debt) to pay for the assets we build. For example, we would borrow money to build a new swimming pool and we would use rates and/or entry fees to pay for the day-to-day running of the pool. In addition to balancing our budget each year, a key constraint we have is the need to ensure that the revenue we receive each year is high enough to support the debt we have taken on to finance the new assets we are building.

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Where your rates go

Transport - $38 for each $100 of rates is spent on transport this includes $20 for building and maintaining roads and footpaths to support a growing and more active Auckland.

Parks, community and lifestyle - $27 for each $100 of rates is spent on parks, communities and lifestyle, this includes $7 for libraries and other community and arts facilities, community, arts and cultural grants, events and programmes.

Environmental management and regulation - $16 for each $100 of rates is spent on environmental management and regulation this includes $5 for a stormwater network that protects homes from flooding, $7 for rubbish and recycling services and $4 for regulatory activities including consenting and enforcement.

Auckland development - $8 for each $100 of rates is spent on Auckland development this includes $7 for area planning, town centre investment and police development and $1 for developing our waterfront.

Economic and cultural development - $6 for each $100 of rates is spent on economic and cultural development this includes $3 for major arts and sporting venues, the Auckland Zoo and the Auckland Art Gallery.

Governance and support - $5 for each $100 of rates is spent on governance and support this includes supporting 170 elected representatives making decisions for Auckland, grants to museums, and other regional facilities and amenities.

Water supply and wastewater - $0 for each $100 of rates is spent on Water supply and wastewater. This is funded through direct charges to provide a network for drinking water provision and wastewater collection and processing.

For more information on this issue please see section 2.1 of the supporting information for this consultation document.

Feedback question: Delivering our planned investments and services will require an average rates increase of 2.5 per cent for 2017/2018. A higher rates increase would enable us to do more, while a lover rates increase would mean we can do less. See question 1 on the feedback form.

 

Issue 2: Rating stability

We consider that businesses should pay a greater share of rates than residential properties but that the present share is too high and should be reduced gradually over time. Our current policy seeks to achieve this by applying a higher than average rates increase to residential ratepayers each year, and a lower than average increase to business ratepayers.

For example, with a 2.5 per cent overall average rates increase, our current rating policy would result in residential ratepayers having rates increases of approximately 3 per cent and business having approximately a 1.5 per cent increase.

Options

Option A: Retain our current policy so residential ratepayers have a higher increase than business ratepayers

Option B: Change our policy so business and residential ratepayers have the same increase in 2017/2018

Our preferred option

Our preferred option is to achieve stability by applying the same rates to business and residential ratepayers. This would mean amending our Revenue and Financing policy to pause our policy of gradually lowering business rates for one year. This will extend the time to reach the policy’s target goal by one year to 2037/2038.

We consider that stability is particularly important for 2017/2018 because of:

For more information on this issue please see section 2.2 of the supporting information for this consultation document.

Feedback question: The council has been adjusting the share of general rates between businesses and residential ratepayers over time, this has resulted in businesses having a smaller increase than residential ratepayers. We are proposing that for 2017/2018 both should receive the same rates increase. See question 2 on the feedback form.

 

Issue 3: Paying for tourism promotion

The council currently spends $20-$30 million of general rates money each year on tourism promotion and major events which provide significant benefits to accommodation providers such as hotels and motels. To continue to support Auckland’s rapid tourism growth while keeping rates fair and affordable, we need to consider new ways to pay for this spending.

Options

Option A: Continue to fund with general rates

Option B: Fund with targeted rate on accommodation providers

Our preferred option

Our preference is to fund tourism promotion costs from a targeted rate on accommodation providers as the connection between visitor attraction and their customer base is strongest.

This would allow the rates currently collected for this purpose to be invested in urgently needed infrastructure for the city, such as transport improvements – benefitting residents and visitors alike.

If this new approach is approved, we would create a new group including industry representatives to provide direction on how the money is spent.

We explored a range of other possible funders for the proposed rate. While businesses such as restaurants, cafes and taxis also benefit from visitors, the majority of their revenue comes from Auckland residents. A targeted rate on accommodation providers ensures that very little of the cost of visitor attraction falls on Auckland residents, as nearly all the sector’s revenue is from visitors. Discussion of all the options considered can be found in section 2.3 of the supporting information for this consultation document.

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For more information on this issue please see section 2.3 of the supporting information for this consultation document.

Feedback question: The council spends $20 - $30 million on tourism promotion and major events each year. We are proposing to fund this from a targeted rate on accommodation providers rather than general rates. See question 3 on the feedback form.

 

Issue 4: Paying for housing infrastructure

All houses require roads, drains, water supply and sewerage. The council currently invests billions of dollars to provide for a growing Auckland, but this is not enough to keep up with the unprecedented demand for housing. We need new ways to pay for all the costs involved in unlocking more land for houses, without the need for large increases in general rates.

Options

Option A: Continue to only rely on existing growth changes

Option B: Change our funding policy to allow for the use of targeted rates, alongside existing growth charges, to fund infrastructure for new houses

Option B: Rely on existing tools for now and request central government to provide new growth charges for growth infrastructure

Our preferred option

Our preference is to act now to change our funding policy to allow for growth infrastructure targeted rates so those who benefit from the infrastructure, including those who get the resulting increase in their land values, help to pay for it, rather than the ratepayers across Auckland. We will also look to work closely with central government on possible new funding tools for the future, but we can’t afford to just wait until these are implemented.

This policy change would provide another tool that can be used to overcome critical barriers to getting more houses built right now, while also providing an incentive for developers to actually release land rather than land bank.

At this stage, we would just amend our Revenue and Financing policy.

If this policy is amended, it would give us the capacity to look at introducing a specific targeted rate by working in partnership with key landowners as part of a comprehensive development agreement. Before any decisions are made on proceeding with a targeted rate, a detailed proposal would be developed for the council to consider and full consultation with affected parties would be undertaken.

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Examples of infrastructure are street lights, community facilities, public transport, parks, roads, footpaths, water, wastewater, stormwater, and sportsfields.

For more information on this issue please see section 2.4 of the supporting information for this consultation document.

Question: The council is proposing to change our funding policy to allow infrastructure for new housing developments to be funded by targeted rates alongside existing growth charges, rather than ratepayers across Auckland. See question 4 on the feedback form.

 

Issue 5: Paying council staff a living wage

A living wage is defined as the income necessary to provide workers and their families with the basic necessities of life. A living wage will enable workers to live with dignity and to participate as active citizens in society. It is currently $19.80 per hour based on the published rate by Living Wage Movement Aotearoa New Zealand and we estimate it may increase to be around $20.20 per hour in 2017/2018 based on council projections. The current adult minimum wage is $15.25 per hour, and it will be $15.75 an hour from 1 April 2017.

While the starting point would be the amount published by Living Wage Movement Aotearoa New Zealand, it would be necessary for us to calculate the growth rate within the council budget projections. Our intention is to offer a fair wage that can be appropriately funded in the long run.

At present around 2,200 staff employed by the council and its substantive council-controlled organisations (CCOs) earn less than $20.20 per hour. 66 per cent of these staff are female.

Options

Option A: Continue with current pay policies

Option B: Implement a living wage policy for staff of Auckland Council and its substantive CCOs

Our preferred option

Our preference is to introduce a living wage for council staff as we believe this is more equitable and we perceive the benefits justify the investment. It will ensure people working for the council can meet their basic cost of living, but we will make sure we do this without the need for higher rate increases. At the same time, it will help address pay equity issues between male and female employees. We believe Auckland Council should play a key leadership role on these important issues.

For more information on this issue please see section 2.5 of the supporting information for this consultation document.

Question: The council is proposing to implement a living wage policy over the council term ending October 2019 to ensure all council staff can afford typical living costs. This would be funded from efficiencies within the existing budget. See question 5 on the feedback form.

 

Priorities in your local area for 2017/2018

This section sets out the key local priorities for each local board area and any changes we are thinking of making for 2017/2018. We are seeking your feedback on whether we have got these priorities right.

For more information about the priorities for your local area, please see section 2.6 of the supporting information for this consultation document.

Key priorities for 2017/2018

Albert-Eden Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priority in addition to what is planned:

Franklin Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Great Barrier Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Henderson-Massey Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Howick Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Kaipātiki Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priority in addition to what is planned:

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Manurewa Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Ōrākei Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Papakura Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Puketāpapa Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Rodney Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Upper Harbour Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Waiheke Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Waitākere Ranges Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Waitematā Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

Whau Local Board

Planning to continue the following priorities:

Proposing the following priorities in addition to what is planned:

For more information on Local Board priorities please see section 2.6 of the supporting information for this consultation document.

Question: In your opinion, have we got our priorities right for this local board area in 2017/2018? See question 6a and 6b on the feedback form.

 

Part three: Other changes and budget information for 2017/2018

Other changes for 2017/2018

Waste management and charges

As part our Waste Management and Minimisation Plan, Auckland Council has successfully introduced region-wide inorganic and recycling collections and is establishing a network of Community Recycling Centres. The programme team is reviewing the planned implementation of food waste and refuse collections. This is to ensure services for all waste streams are planned holistically, implemented in a manner giving best value for money, and support the aspirational goal of zero waste to landfill by 2040. The review will delay rolling out the food waste and user pays refuse collection services.

The intent of our Waste Management and Minimisation Plan is to move to a charging regime that promotes waste minimisation. Waste management services have been transitioning to a region-wide delivery approach. The associated charges have been incrementally adjusted from the legacy council regimes.

In 2017/2018 every ratepayer will be provided with the same inorganic collections and recycling services, funded by a standard region-wide rate of $102 (including GST). The new recycling service will offer all residents the choice of a 120 litre, 240 litre or 360 litre bin. With customers now having the option of the larger 360 litre bin funded from their base rate, the council will charge an additional $62 per annum for an additional bin and will no longer provide a free commercial cardboard collection in selected town centres and commercial areas in the former Rodney, North Shore and Waitakere council areas.

Next year the council will also introduce a rates funded 120 litre refuse bin service in the former Manukau City Council area. Residents with a high volume of refuse will be able to have a 240 litre bin instead of a 120 litre for an additional $55 per annum.

For more information on waste management and charges please see section 3 of the supporting information.

Mass transit network

Auckland continues to face serious transport access issues involving the city centre, the inner suburbs, the Airport and the South. As the population and demand for public transport increases, the number of buses and cars from those areas which are not served by rail will cause significant congestion and affect economic growth. Auckland Transport (AT) continues its work to determine an effective public transport solution to this issue.

In 2017/2018, $40 million is budgeted for AT to progress this work. This includes:

Business Improvement District rates

The council is proposing four changes to Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rates at the request of the following business associations:

BIDs support improvements to local business areas and help attract new business and customers.

For full details of all the proposed BID targeted rates for 2017/2018 please see section 3 of the supporting information for this consultation document.

SkyPath implementation

The SkyPath is a pathway attachment to the Auckland Harbour Bridge which completes a missing link in the walking and cycling network across the Waitematā Harbour. The project would be structured as a hybrid public private partnership (PPP). The private sector would fund (by pedestrian and cyclist user charges) the construction and operation of SkyPath.

On 28 July 2016, the Governing Body agreed to proceed with the SkyPath project and make a budget provision in the Annual Budget2017/2018 and the Long-term Plan 2018- 2028. This includes:

Collaborating on reducing homelessness

Auckland faces a significant challenge in relation to homelessness.

The council will look to play a coordinating role bringing together central government agencies like Housing New Zealand, Ministry of Social Development, District Health Boards and Police with non-governmental organisations (NGOs), private businesses supporting the homeless and groups representing the homeless. A budget of $500,000 is proposed for this.

Rural fire service

Auckland Council is a key player in delivering and funding rural fire services. The Fire and Emergency New Zealand (FENZ) Bill is currently before Parliament and is expected to pass in April 2017. If passed, it will amalgamate New Zealand's urban and rural fire services into an integrated fire and emergency service. Consequently, the council would no longer deliver rural fire services as of 1 July 2017. The net financial impact of the change is likely to be minimal.

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Key developments and improvements across the Auckland region in 2017/2018

North Auckland:

West Auckland

CBD / East Auckland

South Auckland

Region-wide




Text to describe the infographic above.

Area of spend

Capital spend 2017/2018 $1.961bn

Operating spend 2017/2018 $3.822bn

How operating costs are funded

Rates per $100

What will be delivered

Key performance indicators

Transport

$730 million

$1.354 billion

 Rates: 53%

 Other, inc. fees and charges: 47%

$38

 

  • building and maintaining all local and main arterial roads

  • footpaths, cycle paths, bridges, carparks, culverts etc.

  • providing public transport services – trains, buses, ferries

  • invest in rail, bus stations and ferry infrastructure

  • transport safety, education and enforcement

  • continued work on key infrastructure projects, including City Rail Link and AMETI

  • year 3 of the accelerated transport programme, which included an additional $523m capital expenditure over three years funded by the interim transport levy.

  • increase public transport boardings to over 93 million trips, improve punctuality to 94% and customer satisfaction to 85%
  • maintain optimum travel time on key freight routes for 85 per cent of trips
  • grow annual number of cycling trips on Auckland Transport’s designated routes to 1.8 million per year.

Parks, community and lifestyle

$318 million

$594 million

 Rates: 85 per cent

 Other, incl. fees and charges: 15%

$27

  • regional and local parks

  • libraries, community facilities, community services and grants

  • new community facility at Westgate

  • arts and cultural facilities, activities and community events

  • swimming pools and recreation centres.

 
  • maintain and increase overall service levels for our local and regional parks to continue to enjoy high visitor numbers
  • significant investment in sportsfields to improve satisfaction of the provision and quality to 80%
  • grow over 60,000 native plants in the Botanic Gardens for revegetation programmes
  • 25 sites of significance on Tūpuna Maunga with mitigation measures to improve or maintain their condition.

Environmental management and regulation

$125 million

$490 million

Rates: 55%

Other, inc. fees and charges: 45%

$16

  •  building and maintaining the stormwater network
  • improving the quality of water in streams and harbours
  • waste collection, inc. recycling and reducing waste to landfill
  • protecting biodiversity
  • undertaking regulatory activities such as resource and building consents, dog control, food licensing and swimming pool inspections.
 
  • ensure no more than 1 in 1000 properties connected to our stormwater system is flooded per year
  • have four resource recovery facilities operational
  • establish 8 hectares of new forest or wetland habitats per year
  • ensure all closed landfills are compliant with their discharge consents
  • protect waterways with 37 kilometres of riparian planting and or fencing
  • 30% of catchments have key source of contaminants identified and mitigated.

Auckland development

$163 million

$197 million

 Rates: 54%

 Other, inc. fees and charges: 46%

$8

  • planning and policy development, waterfront development, town centre development, property management and development
  • enabling housing development through existing and future spatial priority areas.

 

 
  • creating a vibrant Waterfront that attracts over 75% of Aucklanders to the Waterfront each year
  • increase the proportion of residents who are proud of the way their local area looks and feels from 64% in 2010 to 90% in 2040
  • Create 50 economic, business, and city building opportunities through the Auckland Council global engagement programme
  • Protect 2180 historic heritage places in the Unitary Plan.

Economic and cultural developmet

$48 million

$188 million

 Rates: 61%

 Other, inc. fees and charges: 39%

$6

  •  managing major attractions, venues and sports stadiums
  • an increased focus on marketing Auckland as a leisure destination.
 
  • major events contributing $49m in 2016/17 towards the regional GDP
  • grow visitors to Auckland Zoo and Art Gallery to 1.17 million visitors per year and maintain a 90% customer satisfaction level
  • host 830 public art performances through Auckland Live
  • host 785 days of commercial events and 980 days of community events at our stadiums.

Governance and support

$165 million

$439 million

 Rates: 24%

 Other, inc. fees and charges: 76%

$5

 
  • Local Body support and meeting processes
  • corporate functions such as finance, legal, communications and human resources
  • Auckland Council Investments Ltd, including Ports of Auckland
  • grants to Auckland War Memorial Museum, MoTAT and the Auckland Regional Facilities and Amenities.

 

 

  • reducing corporate costs through an ongoing efficiency programme to achieve annual savings of $260 million by end of FY2018
  • deliver a return on equity of 11.5% on major investments.

Water supply and wastewater

$413 million

$560 million

 Rates: 0%

 Other, inc. fees and charges: 100%

$0

 
  • building and maintaining the network of pipes, dams, treatment plants, pumps required to provide a high standard of drinking water and treating wastewater
  • continue to work on the delivery of major projects such as the Central Interceptor wastewater project.
 
  • maintain 100% compliance with Drinking-water Standards for New Zealand
  • less than 10 wastewater system overflows per 1000 connections in dry weather conditions.



Reviewing our budgets

We are not proposing any significant new items of spending, major changes to projects, or changes to services we provide, compared with what we set out for 2017/2018 in our 10-year budget. We will, however, review our group budgets to ensure we continue to deliver the best value for money to ratepayers. This includes:

This review is likely to result in some budget changes when our final budgets for 2017/2018 are agreed by June 2017. None of the budget changes for 2017/2018 are likely to have any material implications for the financial strategy included in the 10-year budget 2015-2025.

Co-governance of volcanic cones

The Ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau Collective Redress Act 2014 (the Act) came into effect on 29 August 2014. The Act vested the Crown-owned land on 14 Tūpuna Maunga (ancestral mountains/volcanic cones) in 13 iwi/hapū groups with interests in Auckland (Ngā Mana Whenua o Tamaki Makaurau). The Act also established the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (a co-governance body between the council and Ngā Mana Whenua) to administer the Tūpuna Maunga.

The Act requires that the Tūpuna Maunga Authority prepare an Annual Operational Plan to provide a framework in which the council will carry out the routine management of the 14 Tūpuna Maunga, under the direction of the Maunga Authority. This must be prepared and adopted concurrently with the council’s annual budget and included in summary form. A summary of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority’s draft Operational Plan 2017/2018 can be found in section 3 of the supporting information for this consultation document.


Budget 2017/2018 – an overview

How much we are spending

Capital investment $2 billion, this includes:

Operating expenditure $3.8 billion, this includes:

How we pay for this

General rates:

Interim transport levy:

The final year of the interim levy ($63 million)

Solid Waste targeted rates:

Water and wastewater fees:

Other fees and charges:

Borrowing

Central government funding

Question: To give feedback on other changes and budget information for 2017/2018 please see the question “Any other feedback?” on the feedback form.

 

Part four: Give us your views

We want to hear your views on our annual budget, so we encourage you to take the time to get involved. The public consultation runs from 27 February to Monday 27 March 2017 by 4pm.

There are a number of ways you can give feedback, depending on what suits you. These include:

Written feedback: You can contribute feedback online at shapeauckland.co.nz or fill out the attached feedback form and send it to the freepost address provided, or email it to: annualbudget@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

In person: We want make it as easy as possible for you to tell us your views, so we have replaced formal hearings with ‘Have your say’ events during the consultation period. These are designed to give you an opportunity to be heard by the council’s decision-makers.

Events will be spread across the region with various times and days, which you’ve told us, are more convenient. To find your nearest event, visit shapeauckland.co.nz or call 09 301 0101.

If you have a community group or organisation and would like us to attend to talk more about particular topics we are consulting on, we would love to hear from you; just email us at annualbudget@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Social media: Comments made through the following channels will be considered written feedback:

On Facebook

On Twitter

 

Frequently asked questions

Question: So what happens to my feedback?

Answer: Great question! Your feedback is collated, analysed and presented to the elected members to consider and debate before they make the decisions for the coming financial year. Where you have provided your email address, we will come back to you and let you know the decisions in July.

Question: Is there any point telling you my view?

Answer: Absolutely! Every piece of feedback is important and past consultations have shown that public feedback can and does change how the elected members make decisions. Obviously this can only happen if you tell us your views.

Question: Is this my only time to express my views?

Answer: This consultation focusses on what the council delivers over the coming financial year only, however we will be coming back to you to ask for your views in other areas. Please visit shapeauckland.co.nz to find out about other consultations that may be of interest to you.

Question: Where can I find more information?

Answer: Information on these issues is included in this consultation document available at shapeauckland.co.nz, and in your local library, service centre, or local board office. If you require a hardcopy of the consultation material please email annualbudget@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz or phone 09 301 0101.

Key dates – 2017