Draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan

October 2012

 

Text Document Version

 


Table of Contents

Hibiscus and Bays vision  4

How to be involved  6

What are Area Plans?  7

The relationship between area plans and other plans  8

Local Board Plans  8

Council’s Long Term Plan (LTP) 8

The Unitary Plan  8

The role and purpose of the area plan  9

How the Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan works  9

Key assumptions of the Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan  10

Community engagement in the Draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan  11

The engagement approach  11

Māori engagement in the Draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan  12

Next Steps  12

Setting the strategic context: Auckland wide  13

The Auckland Plan  13

The Auckland Plan Development Strategy 14

What does the Auckland Plan mean for the Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan?  14

Setting the local context:  Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Area  16

The attraction of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area  16

The people and places of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area  16

Future challenges and opportunities for Hibiscus and Bays  Local Board area  17

Outcomes and actions for the Hibiscus and Bays  18

Table 1: Auckland’s Vision -  The World’s Most Liveable City –  Te Pai Me Te Whai Rawa Ō Tamaki 19

Hibiscus and Bays key moves  22

Table 2: Hibiscus and Bays Six Key Moves  23

Area Plan Framework  25

The land use approach  25

Business  25

Open space  26

Countryside living  26

Rural  27

Special use zone  27

Future planning areas  28

Staging and timing  28

Mixed uses  29

Table 3 the four mixed-use zones 29

Living Environments  30

Table 4, the four living zones  30

Hibiscus and Bays Town Centres, Local Centres and Neighbourhood Centres  32

Town Centres  32

Table 5: Hibiscus and Bays Town Centres and their specific desired outcomes  33

Local Centres  37

Table 6: Hibiscus and Bays Local Centres and their specific desired outcomes  37

Neighbourhood Centres  39

Table 7: Hibiscus and Bays Neighbourhood Centres and their specific desired outcomes  39

Coastal Villages  41

Table 8: Hibiscus and Bays Coastal Villages and their specific desired outcomes  41

Natural, Heritage and Character Outcomes  43

Economic and Community Development Outcomes  47

Transport and Network Infrastructure Outcomes  51

Implementation and prioritisation plan  54

Key priorities  55

10-year prioritisation schedule  56

Table 9A: Further Planning required  56

Table 9B: Funded Projects/Initiatives                                                                                                     57

Table 9C: Projects/Initiatives Eligible for Funding from Region-wide Budgets 63

Table 9D: Aspirational Projects/Initiatives 65

Glossary-papakupu  68

Hibiscus and Bays vision


The Draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan provides a vision for how the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area could change over the next 30 years. It outlines the steps to achieve this vision and how the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area will contribute to Auckland becoming the world’s most liveable city. 

This Draft Area Plan will incorporate the aspirations and goals of the community, key stakeholders and Mana Whenua, while addressing the growth projections set out in the Auckland Plan.  Many of the issues, aspirations, and opportunities for the Hibiscus and Bays area are not new.

There are six key transformational shifts for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area:

-          Establish the ‘North-West Wildlink’ as a continuous greenbelt, complemented by improved quality of the adjoining estuarine and marine environment

-          Grow the green economy and ecotourism potential of Hibiscus and Bays by leveraging off the area’s natural assets

-          Build a continuous coastal pathway to connect Hibiscus and Bays’ communities

-          Focus growth in centres, and in areas with high amenity and good access to public transport

-          Improve transport connections throughout the area by extending the Northern Busway, implementing Penlink and associated works, and by promoting potential, new water-based transport. 

-          Develop employment land in and around Silverdale to increase employment opportunities for local people.

The objective of the Draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan is to provide greater choices of where and how people will live, work and play in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. Future development must respond to the needs of the diverse ethnic and youthful community in the area, including providing access to employment opportunities and a wider range of housing options.

The delivery of area plan outcomes in a 30-year timeframe will require a collaborative approach between the community, Mana Whenua and key delivery partners including Auckland Council, council controlled organisations (CCOs), central government agencies and private land owners.

Investment in physical and social infrastructure including transport, open space, community facilities, and schools, is needed to meet the growth in business and population. But such investment must be balanced with protecting the highly valued and sensitive features of the area. 

Initiatives in this Draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan recognise and build on the area’s cultural and historical values, and its highly valued landscapes.

“Hibiscus and Bays - values our beaches and coastal context, landscapes, way of life and people”. Vision from Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan, Page 2

How to be involved

This is a draft plan. Your input is important to us and we want to hear your views and comments.

This is your opportunity to contribute to the future direction of the Hibiscus and Bays area by letting us know what you like, dislike and think we may have forgotten.  All feedback will be considered when developing the final Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan. 

We invite you to have your say. You can give us feedback by post, email, or on our website. 

By post:

Freepost Authority 241331

Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan

Auckland Council

Private Bag 92300

Victoria Street West

Auckland 1142

By email: areaplans@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

By website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/areaplans

To see or download the Draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan and feedback form visit the Council’s website at www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/areaplans

Hard copies will also be available from local libraries, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board office, and on request by phoning (09) 301 0101 or emailing areaplans@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

We will also be active in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area from 23 October to 23 November 2012.  You will find information about the events on our website and displayed in local libraries. 

All feedback must be received by 5.00pm on Friday 23 November 2012.

What are Area Plans?

An area plan is a key tool in Auckland Council’s strategic planning framework. The purpose of an area plan is to show how the Auckland Plan (its outcomes, proposed changes and strategic directions) will be put in place at the local level.

An area plan uses tools such as the Unitary Plan, local board plans, the Long Term Plan and emerging Council strategies to help deliver the Auckland plan’s objectives.  An area plan prioritises those future activities and projects for an area that are required to achieve Auckland’s Vision of creating “the world’s most liveable city”.

Each area plan shows, in maps and words, the 30-year vision for an area.  Key parts of an area plan include the proposed land-uses (shown in the area plan framework, map 2) and the important economic, environmental, social and cultural outcomes and initiatives (as shown in three theme maps). The result is an integrated vision of how an area could look and function in the future.

Auckland Council will develop 21 area plans, each focused at the local board level. Once complete, each plan will ‘seamlessly integrate’ with the other area plans and will form a single picture of Auckland.

The outcomes and aspirations set out in an area plan include those that Council and its various departments may deliver and those that will be undertaken by Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs). They also include outcomes and aspirations that might be achieved by influencing the activities of, and/or forming close partnerships with, other parties such as government agencies, private landowners and community organisations.

Developing an area plan should resolve differences between local aspirations and Auckland Plan objectives. Then the plan can focus on other processes, such as the need for more detailed planning in the future and the need for key infrastructure (including social facilities) to support these aims.


The relationship between area plans and other plans

Local Board Plans

Local board plans provide community-level vision, and priorities and projects for each local board. Each of the 21 local boards in Auckland has a local board plan and an annual agreement with the governing body. These agreements set out how much funding is available for local board projects in each area.

The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan has played a key role in helping to identify area plan priorities, projects and community aspirations. This plan sets out the vision and priorities for the Local Board area. The Local Board and the community have identified projects and these are included in this area plan. Local board plans must be reviewed every three years.

Council’s Long Term Plan (LTP)

The LTP is Council’s main budgetary tool that combines funding from all council and council controlled organisation (CCO) across Auckland over a 10 year timeframe. Essentially, this plan is Auckland Council’s to-do list. It implements the Auckland Plan, and includes projects and initiatives identified in the local board plan.

The area plan identifies projects, programmes, strategies and policies essential to delivering the growth direction set out in the Auckland Plan, influenced in part by key local aspirations. Listed within the Prioritisation Schedule, they include projects already funded within Council’s 2012 LTP and unfunded projects for funding priority in the next LTP (in three years’ time). It can also be used to direct the Council’s yearly review by way of the annual plan process.

The Unitary Plan

Council is developing Auckland’s first Unitary Plan to replace the district and regional plans and policies of the former city, district and regional councils. Prepared under the Resource Management Act (1991), the Unitary Plan is Council’s main land-use planning document. Its objectives, policies and rules will help implement the Auckland Plan. The Unitary Plan will also have regulatory provisions that achieve the area plan outcomes.

It will not be possible for all area plans to be completed across Auckland before the Unitary Plan is first publicly notified. However, area plan outputs and analysis will be introduced into the draft Unitary Plan over time when and as each area plan is completed. The area plans will inform the Unitary Plan by outlining a range of land uses under the broad categories of living, business, mixed use, rural, open space and special purpose.  The three area plan theme maps will identify local values and/or features. The policies and rules used in the Unitary Plan will reinforce these. The Unitary Plan is one tool to help implement the area plan.

The role and purpose of the area plan

How the Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan works

The Draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan provides a vision for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area for the next 30 years. Six key moves have been identified that respond to the Auckland Plan’s ‘Transformational Shifts’ and will be integral to making the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area a great place to live and work in the future.

To help deliver the six key moves, the Area Plan Framework sets out the future land uses for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area in line with the Auckland Plan’s Development Strategy and the emerging Unitary Plan.

The specific theme-based aspirations and outcomes that influence the framework map are grouped into: Natural, Heritage and Character, Economic and Community Development, and Transport and Network Infrastructure.

Each theme has local, place-based outcomes and a number of action steps that will support and deliver the outcomes by way of the 10-year Prioritisation Plan and Schedule. These actions are in the form of projects, programmes, studies and policies. They identify where further planning work is required – and highlight where investment is needed over the next 10 years.  

Four key components and six maps can summarise the above:

1.      Hibiscus and Bays key moves, shows the six key opportunities that respond to the Auckland Plan’s transformational shifts and will be integral to making Hibiscus and Bays a great place to live and work in 30 years (see map 1)

2.      The Area Plan Framework Map, shows future land use outcomes and how the areas will grow (see map 2)

3.      Theme-based outcomes for the area grouped under:

a.      Natural, Heritage and Character (see map 3)

b.      Economic and Community Development (see Map 4)

c.      Transport and Network Infrastructure (see Map 5)

4.      The ten-year prioritisation plan (see map 6)

More detail on these maps can be found on pages 20 to 50.

 

Key assumptions of the Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan

The Draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan assumes that over the next 30 years the area will change and grow as set out in the Area Plan Framework. The framework assumes that the area will keep its character and values, supported by investment in physical infrastructure (such as roads, rail, wastewater and stormwater networks) and social infrastructure (such as parks, schools, and community and educational facilities). 

Community engagement in the Draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan

Several factors influenced how this Draft Area Plan developed. The process included a review of extensive community engagement done for the Auckland Plan. It was also based on a review of local board plans and other recent plans, including those developed by the former North Shore City and Rodney District Councils. Council used the information from these reviews to identify and understand the local values, issues, challenges, aspirations and opportunities in the Hibiscus and Bays area.

In preparing this Draft Area Plan, Council asked key stakeholders how the area plan might be delivered successfully. These stakeholders included Mana Whenua, Mataawaka (Māori from outside this area), central and local government agencies, infrastructure providers and local business associations. They will have more opportunities to engage and provide feedback as the Draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan progresses.

The engagement approach

A working group of Hibiscus and Bays Local Board members and Councillors has guided this Draft Area Plan. The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board and the Auckland Plan Committee have now approved it for public engagement.

A diagram included, shows an overview of the engagement approach taken so far to develop the draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan. It shows three steps taken to date:

1.      Review existing consultation feedback to identify feedback relevant to the Area Plan

2.      Targeted engagement with key stakeholders and Mana whenua to confirm feedback to previous plan and address any information gaps

3.      Now moving into public engagement with stakeholders, Mana whenua and the public on the draft area plan

 

A diverse range of events, supported by different communication channels, will be held in October and November 2012 to inform the public about the Draft Area Plan and to gain feedback.

Māori engagement in the Draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan

Mana Whenua have an enduring and primary connection with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.  The Mana Whenua of the Hibiscus and Bays Area are coastal people and their history and identity remains closely bound to the Hibiscus Coast and Bays due to ancestral occupation and continued interest in the land.  While their physical presence in the area has progressively diminished, there are aspirations to reverse this trend and build cultural focus points and opportunities for Māori within the area. 

This Draft Area Plan aims to put in place steps to build a future that will benefit all Māori living in the Hibiscus and Bays area. Mana Whenua have their own places and aspirations for the Hibiscus and Bays area. They continue to undertake their traditional practices, including tikanga, exercise of kaitiakitanga and harvest of kaimoana within their rohe. Lifting Māori social and economic well-being is one of the key drivers of this Area Plan.

In developing this Draft Area Plan, Council has met with Mana Whenua and Mataawaka between March and June 2012 to identify Māori issues, values and aspirations. Further engagement of Mana Whenua will be required as the area plan develops and progresses to implementation. These groups will be able to give feedback when Council talks to the community about the Draft Area Plan in October 2012. Relationships developed with Mana Whenua will benefit the communities and environment of the Hibiscus Coast and Bays Local Board area. 

Next Steps

All feedback received will be considered when developing the final Area Plan. It will then be reported to both the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board and the Auckland Plan Committee, for adoption in March 2013.

Setting the strategic context: Auckland wide

The Auckland Plan

Auckland’s vision is to become “the world’s most liveable city”. As such, Auckland will be a place that has cohesive resilient communities; a productive high-value economy; quality urban, rural and natural environments and a robust and resilient transport system. The Auckland Plan outcomes recognise both Māori and multi-cultural qualities of the area by emphasising a Māori identity as Auckland’s point of difference in the world and a culturally rich and creative Auckland.

The Auckland region expects an extra 1 million people and 400,000 new households by 2040. The Auckland Plan is a strategic plan that provides guidance on how to manage this while keeping the things we value most about Auckland.

The vision of Auckland becoming the “world’s most liveable city” will not be achieved by incremental change, transformational change is needed.  The Auckland Plan six key transformational shifts will help achieve the Auckland vision and these will require commitment, investment and collaboration from all.  The Auckland Plan six key transformational shifts are:

-          Dramatically accelerate the prospects of Auckland’s children and young people

-          Strongly commit to environmental action and green growth

-          Move to outstanding public transport within one network

-          Radically improve the quality of urban living

-          Substantially raise living standards for all Aucklanders and focus on those most in need

-          Significantly lift Māori social and economic well-being

These six shifts are key drivers for the Draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan. Identifying where people want to live, work and play, and future land uses will help achieve the transformational shifts.

This Draft Area Plan also identifies critical infrastructure, social and cultural services and environmental outcomes that support Auckland’s Vision. It shows how infrastructure, services and outcomes link to the LTP, Unitary Plan and other key programmes and partnerships to help put the area plan into practice.

The Auckland Plan Development Strategy

The Auckland Plan Development Strategy identifies the expected level of change and growth across Auckland over the next 30 years, and where we expect to see that growth. The Strategy supports new employment and residential areas to meet expected growth. A key focus of the Strategy is to achieve a compact city by focussing growth in existing urban areas. The Strategy also sees the need to phase in greenfield areas for residential and commercial development.

What does the Auckland Plan mean for the Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan?

The draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan sets out local community planning aspirations and outcomes that will help deliver on the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan.

The Auckland Plan expects that there will be an extra 95,000 households in the Urban North and West area of Auckland over the next 30 years (source Auckland Plan 2012). Of this, there is likely to be approximately 25,000 new homes and 18,000 new jobs in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. This anticipated growth will help to fund the social, cultural and recreational improvements that will be needed to maintain the area’s high amenity values.

This Draft Area Plan responds to local environmental and community characteristics in the Hibiscus and Bays areas. It interprets and applies the Auckland Plan’s Development Strategy by proposing that areas of residential and employment development occur in locations that can best support growth, such as town and local centres. Creating a high quality, liveable, compact city will see parts of Hibiscus and Bays area change over time, such as the development of more businesses and homes including a wider range of housing choices.

Most future residential and employment growth will be concentrated in and around the four town centres of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area – Browns Bay, Ōrewa, Silverdale and Whangaparāoa.  New development will need to enhance the Hibiscus and Bays’ unique built and natural character. Improvements such as streetscape upgrades and enhanced transport, community and social services will be required to meet the needs of the growing communities.   Local centres, such as Mairangi Bay, Torbay and Red Beach, may also experience further residential development.

The change will not be sudden. Over the next 30 years, centres and surrounding existing suburbs could see a third of their housing redeveloped (mainly to town houses, apartments and 2-storey units). Some specific areas will be further developed to take advantage of north-facing ridgelines, panoramic views, and good access to transport routes and community amenities. More people living in Browns Bay, Mairangi Bay and Ōrewa will strengthen these communities. New and improved infrastructure, social services and amenities, such as parks and reserves will be needed for the increased population.

Setting the local context:
Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Area

The attraction of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area 

Located north of Auckland, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area adjoins the Rodney, Upper Harbour and Devonport-Takapuna Local Board areas, and is strongly characterised by its coastline stretching from Waiwera in the north to Campbells Bay in the south. Beaches, estuaries, headlands and cliffs are significant features along the coastline. The coastline and coastal waters have provided opportunities for transport, food, defence and recreation since early Māori times. Consequently, it features many heritage and cultural features, which need to be celebrated and protected. Some are major attractions such as the environmental jewels of Long Bay-Ōkura Marine Reserve, Ōkura Scenic Reserve and the Long Bay and Shakespear Regional Parks. Any new development over the next 30 years should leverage off, rather than undermine, the qualities of the attractive coastal, natural and rural environment of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

The coastline and upper estuarine catchments unite the northern urban area with the greenbelt and southern urban area to form the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. The urban areas were developed once the Auckland Harbour Bridge opened in May 1959.  Cars became the main means of transport and the ease of transport saw an increase in large-lot residential subdivisions. Early subdivision patterns followed the local topography with town centres located in valley floors close to the coast. Steady development has resulted in new urban subdivisions and infill housing.

The greenbelt supports the rural economy, lifestyle blocks and a large area of ecological and landscape amenity.  The rural areas are predominantly pastoral with some production forestry and areas of regenerating native bush. Some rural areas have undergone recent changes to accommodate future urban and business development, particularly around Silverdale.

The people and places of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area

Most Hibiscus and Bays residents live in suburban and rural coastal settlements. Since the 1990s, migrants have been a major source of growth in the area. The estimated number of residents in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area has grown from 65,820 in 1996 to an estimated 91,300 in 2011. It is a relatively affluent area with high levels of home ownership, employment and education, with the area’s schools being generally high-decile. But many beneficiaries, especially retired people are attracted to the area because it is close to Auckland, has high amenity values and readily accessible services.

Generally, the East Coast Bays area is well developed, serviced and connected. In contrast, the newer Hibiscus Coast urban area is facing challenges as it continues to grow, particularly in relation to social amenities, local employment, water services and roading capacity.

Future challenges and opportunities for Hibiscus and Bays
Local Board area

The desirability of the Hibiscus and Bays area for more residential and employment development must be carefully managed. The natural (including coastal) environment draws people to the area to live and work. A balance must be reached between maintaining the attractive lifestyle and minimising adverse environmental and social effects. The diverse aspects of the natural environment have the potential to foster a green economy and a sustainable development ethic in the Hibiscus and Bays area. Further, any future development must be planned and implemented to a level that the land and waterways can sustain.

Significant current or planned new residential areas include Millwater (1,800 dwellings), Ōrewa West (2,800 dwellings), Gulf Harbour (1,500 dwellings), Weiti Village (550 dwellings) and Long Bay (2,800 dwellings).

New development and associated civic spaces should be attractive and well-designed to encourage and enhance community interaction. Development and its associated infrastructure must be appropriately funded, programmed, sited and designed so that it is resilient to potential natural hazards land (such as flooding) and coastal hazards. Past development in floodplains and overland flow paths has been affected by localised flooding and other problems. The Council is implementing a programme of Community Response Plans to prepare for a range of emergency events. These plans are already complete for most of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

New amenities such as parks, social services and community facilities are needed to support growing communities in a high-quality urban environment. People use transport for various reasons. Providing a wider range of transport options for all age groups and needs will reduce reliance on private vehicles and so ease traffic congestion. Options include new and improved and walking and cycling routes, and more public transport facilities and services. People will be able to travel more easily around the Hibiscus and Bays area, and to other parts of Auckland.

Although overall education and employment levels are generally high in this area, the challenge is to encourage more local employment and education opportunities for a wider range of people. This is vital for the northern urban area where most commute to jobs and training outside the area. More local jobs would see the number and length of vehicle trips reduce benefiting the area’s economy and productivity.

Whangaparāoa Peninsula is limited by its geography; yet the Auckland Plan shows more people will move into the area. The community has limited job prospects and a proportion of people on low incomes. Young people also have limited access to post-school study and training. A challenge is to provide everyone with efficient access from, to and within the area. For example, the Auckland Plan has earmarked Ōrewa – a suburb connected directly to the Northern Motorway – for moderate change.

Outcomes and actions for the Hibiscus and Bays

This section describes in detail the outcomes and actions for implementing the 30-year vision for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. Table 1, on next page, summarises and shows how Auckland Council and its partners can transform the Hibiscus and Bays area and contribute towards Auckland reaching its goal of becoming the “world’s most liveable city”.

Table 1: Auckland’s Vision -
The World’s Most Liveable City –
Te Pai Me Te Whai Rawa Ō Tamaki

Auckland Plan Transformational Shifts: To achieve the Auckland’s Vision

·        Dramatically accelerate the prospects of Auckland’s children and young people

·        Strongly commit to environmental action and green growth

·        Move to outstanding public transport within one network

·        Radically improve the quality of urban living

·        Substantially raise living standards for all Aucklanders and focus on those most in need

·        Significantly lift Māori social and economic well-being

Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan

Six Key Moves: To support the transformational shifts (First component)

·        Establish the ‘North-West Wildlink’ as a continuous greenbelt complemented by improved quality of the adjoining estuarine and marine environment

·        Grow the green economy and eco-tourism potential of Hibiscus and Bays by leveraging off the area’s natural assets

·        Build a continuous pathway to connect Hibiscus and Bays’ communities

·        Focus growth in centres, and in areas with access to efficient public transport

·        Improve transport connections throughout the area by extending the Northern Busway, implement Penlink and associated works, and by promoting potential, new water-based transport

·        Develop employment land in and around Silverdale to increase employment opportunities for local people

Hibiscus And Bays Area Plan Framework 2042 - Uses a range of environments to show how Hibiscus and Bays could develop over the next 30 years and informed by the three theme-based outcomes (Second component)

Three Theme-Based Outcomes – listed below to each theme (third component)

Natural, heritage and character

Economic & community development

Transport and network infrastructure

The natural and coastal landscape is recognized and promoted as the area’s point of difference

Ecotourism and other innovative rural and maritime economic initiatives are encouraged, leveraging off the high quality natural environment

Business opportunities are unlocked by improving transport connections and public transport services

Estuarine, coastal and marine areas are protected, restored and enhanced

Young people can access training in the trades or at tertiary level within existing and proposed business zones

Improved local, public transport enables more East/West travel, and better links communities to those areas with jobs

Land and freshwater ecosystems are protected and improved to support a diversity of habitats

The area is encouraged to be more business-friendly and prosperous, offering a variety of economic development opportunities

Greater inter-modal transport integration provides more efficient transport networks and greater travel choice

Town centres grow sustainably, reflecting their local nature while providing housing and job choice

Local economic, social, recreational and cultural activities are fostered, keeping in mind the area’s unique coastal and natural environment

The infrastructure network in the Hibiscus and Bays is resilient, sustainable and cost effective

Suburban and rural areas are distinctive, and offer high-quality living and a strong sense of community and place

The Hibiscus and Bays area has a range of urban environments to meet the needs of people of all ages and abilities

Existing and new infrastructure meets the needs of a growing population and urban intensification and adapts to climate change while improving natural freshwater and coastal systems

Places and landscapes of historic and/or cultural significance are identified, protected and celebrated

The re-occupation of tribal rohe (land) and the well-being of the Maori community is provided for, while supporting Mana Whenua to formally exercise kaitiakitanga and achieve Treaty settlement outcomes

Existing and new infrastructure meets the needs of a growing population and urban intensification and adapts to climate change while improving natural freshwater and coastal systems

 

10-year Prioritisation Schedule / Priority Projects for Implementation (Fourth component)

Extend the Northern Busway to Albany and progress planning and funding for PenLink

Implement identified community and social facilities projects

Implement the North-West Wildlink policy through relevant plans and projects

Develop an open space strategy and heritage strategy for the local board area

Research and establish incentives to encourage the green economy in the rural and tourism areas

Develop a hazard response strategy and guidelines for Browns Bay, Orewa and other identified areas

Start future planning for Browns Bay, Silverdale, Mairangi/ Windsor Park, Orewa and Whangaparaoa areas

Progress Te Araroa National Walkway linking new and existing coastal walkways to become a first-class landscape and heritage trail

Hibiscus and Bays key moves

The ‘key moves’ of the Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan are the most important opportunities to solve specific issues facing the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. These key moves will help to transform the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area over the next 30 years into an area that attracts visitors while maintaining the quality lifestyle for residents.

Table two, on the next two pages, illustrates how the key moves will help to achieve the vision for Auckland (including the six transformational shifts) and support the desired outcomes set out in the Auckland Plan.

The draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan will use the Area Plan Framework to help deliver the key moves to achieve the related benefits for the people living in the Hibiscus and Bays area. The Framework has been shaped by the outcomes and actions shown in each of the supporting theme maps.

There is a map included into the document that shows the six key moves spatially over an aerial map of the Hibiscus and Bays local board area, and which are:

-          Establish the ‘North-West Wildlink’ as a continuous greenbelt, complemented by improved quality of the adjoining estuarine and marine environment

-          Grow the green economy and ecotourism potential of Hibiscus and Bays by leveraging off the area’s natural assets

-          Build a continuous coastal pathway to connect Hibiscus and Bays’ communities

-          Focus growth in centres, and in areas with high amenity and good access to public transport

-          Improve transport connections throughout the area by extending the Northern Busway, implementing Penlink and associated works, and by promoting potential, new water-based transport. 

-          Develop employment land in and around Silverdale to increase employment opportunities for local people.


Table 2: Hibiscus and Bays Six Key Moves

Auckland Plan Transformational Shifts: To achieve the Auckland's vision.

Key moves

1:
Dramatically accelerate the prospects of Auckland's children and young people

2:
Strongly commit to environmental action and green growth

3:
Move to outstanding public transport within one network

4:
Radically improve the quality of urban living

5:
Substantially raise living standards for all Aucklanders and focus on those most in need

6:
Significantly lift Māori social and economic well-being

Establish the ‘North-West Wildlink’ as a continuous greenbelt complemented by improved quality of the adjoining estuarine and marine environment

The ‘North-West Wildlink’ stretches from Tiritiri Matangi in the east to the Waitākere Ranges in the west with the potential to increase bird life and restore habitats in a continuous green-belt between Auckland’s coasts. Recognising the ‘North-West Wildlink’ in the Hibiscus and Bays area provides the opportunity to extend the concept into other areas while improving adjoining ecosystems including the Weiti and Ōkura estuaries and the waters around Tiritiri Matangi and the Whangaparāoa Peninsula.

n/a

Ticked

n/a

Ticked

n/a

n/a

Grow the green economy and ecotourism potential of Hibiscus and Bays by leveraging off the area’s natural assets.

There are significant opportunities to promote natural assets and recreational activities for economic benefit in the area while increasing awareness of the value associated with these distinct features. In particular, there are opportunities relating to the geothermal activity at Waiwera, in coastal recreation and in synergies with the knowledge economy uses proposed for Silverdale.

 

Ticked

Ticked

n/a

Ticked

Ticked

Ticked

Build a continuous coastal pathway to connect Hibiscus and Bays’ Communities.

The coastline has always been the major attraction of the Hibiscus and Bays area.  Existing paths by the coast and streams support a healthy community. Linking coastal areas will strengthen the Te Araroa National Walkway, encourage ecological restoration, and build awareness of and possible solutions to issues such as coastal erosion. The pathway will also highlight the area’s distinct landscape and heritage features.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Focus growth in centres, and in areas with high amenity and good access to public transport.

The Hibiscus and Bays area has four town centres (Ōrewa, Whangaparāoa, Silverdale and Browns Bay) and six local centres (Gulf Harbour, Long Bay, Torbay, Northcross, Windsor Park and Mairangi Bay). All provide future job prospects and residential growth that will incorporate and reflect the physical and community attributes of these centres. Long-term opportunities exist in the East Coast Bays area for residential growth as identified in the Area Framework Plan.

 

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Improve transport connections throughout the area by extending the Northern Busway, implementing Penlink and associated works, and by promoting potential, new water-based transport.

The Northern Busway and Penlink will provide transport options and the ability to reduce private vehicle traffic. Penlink, as a multi-modal corridor, has the potential to open up existing and future economic development opportunities in Silverdale. The Northern Busway and future extension will provide a main route, linked to local feeder networks that improve access to public transport to, from and within the Hibiscus and Bays area.

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Develop employment land in and around Silverdale to increase employment opportunities for local people.

The Silverdale Transformation Area is a key driver of change for the wider Hibiscus Coast. By increasing the land available for business employment in Silverdale, residents will spend less time travelling out of the area to and from work. When combined with improved tertiary education and knowledge economy opportunities, young people may be encouraged to stay in the area and contribute to the local economy.

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Area Plan Framework

The Area Plan Framework Map 2042 (Map 2) shows how Hibiscus and Bays could develop over the next 30 years.

The land use approach

These land uses do not represent the final Unitary Plan zones but will guide and inform them as they emerge over time.

The Auckland Plan’s Development Strategy sets out at a high level the form and location of the land uses by directing growth around existing town and local centres as well as moderate growth in surrounding suburbs, to create a quality, compact city. Tables 3 to Table 8 set out the expected land uses and built forms (current and future) in the Hibiscus and Bays town centres, local centres and coastal villages that will support the population and job growth while keeping local character, environmental and amenity values.

The Auckland Plan indicates a large area of Silverdale (a Transformation Area) for greenfields investigation. However, this draft Area Plan recognises the sensitivity of the land on the eastern side of the Northern Motorway and recommends no further urban zoning there.

How the Hibiscus and Bays area grows will be balanced by local aspirations and the particular values identified in the three theme-based outcomes maps. The land use types applied to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area are set out in this section and spatially on Map 2.

The timing of releasing new zoning is heavily reliant on required infrastructure upgrades and on providing appropriate community facilities, open space and schools. Most change to zones by way of the draft Unitary Plan are expected to take place in the East Coast Bays, but how and when the areas develop will depend on those necessary infrastructure upgrades. The Prioritisation Plan and Schedule (Map 6) indicate activities that will take place in the first ten years.

Business

The business zones shown in the Area Plan Framework (Map 2) are core industrial and business service areas. Residential and open-space uses and uses sensitive to noise, odour or heavy vehicles are excluded.

In Hibiscus and Bays, the business zones are split between “services/light industry”, “heavy industry” and “business park”. Over the next 30 years, the business activities in the Hibiscus and Bays area are expected to grow. The number of job opportunities and workers in business areas will increase as the grow and business activity grows. 

The general approach is to encourage heavier industrial activities away from sensitive waterways and control adverse effects on their surrounding catchments. An example of this is to change the heavy industrial zone near the upper Weiti River to a lower impact service/light industrial zoning.

The area west of Silverdale (and in the Rodney Local Board area) has the potential to be developed for new  business uses and will undergo further planning as part of the Greenfields Areas for Investigation and as part of the Silverdale Transformation Area in the Auckland Plan.

Open space

The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area has a range of open space types that range from local urban parks and sporting facilities to beach parks, natural areas and large-scale parks. Larger parks include Freyberg, Centennial, Metro and Victor Eaves sports parks as well as the more remote and natural Shakespear and Long Bay Regional Parks.  All open space has a local function and should be well-linked to urban civic spaces and other community facilities and amenities, by way of walkway networks.

Much of the open space in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area contributes to the strong, natural heritage and landscape amenity character of the area and how it links to the coast as well as providing for a range of sports fields (Map 2).

All reserves in this Draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan are shown as green on Map 2. The actual variety of reserve types is reflected in Map 4: Economic and Community Development Outcomes.

Countryside living

The lifestyle blocks that make up the countryside living zones contribute strongly to the rural and natural character of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. Although there are currently many small, undeveloped lots, the minimum size for lifestyle blocks should be maintained at 2 hectares. Stricter controls must be developed to protect the waterways, estuaries and their upper catchments from degradation, especially in Ōkura/Weiti and Long Bay.

Local communities see a need for physical and visual controls on housing design to encourage greater integration with the landscape and less visual and physical impact on the environment. These controls must work in balance with home-based rural production, ecotourism and/or recreation activities. These activities should be encouraged to provide opportunities for enjoyment of the environment and increasingly support the evolving green economy. The Area Plan Framework shows the countryside living environment in the Hibiscus and Bays area (Map 2).

Rural

The rural environment of the Hibiscus and Bays area is mainly open, undeveloped land that provides for continued rural production activities such as farming, horticulture and mineral extraction such as quarrying.   Buildings within the rural landscape are associated with servicing rural production and include barns, glass houses and storage sheds, and a limited number of residences on large sites. Subdivision is restricted, and where land is unproductive and unstable, ecological restoration is encouraged. Some areas will have a special rural coastal zoning to protect their sensitive and highly valued landscapes. The Area Plan Framework shows the rural environment in the Hibiscus and Bays area (Map 2).

Special use zone

The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area has a range of special use zones – key community facilities or infrastructure that need special zoning to reflect their specific or specialised activities. These environments include schools, cemeteries, defence land and the Ōrewa Gateway (Recreation) Zone (Map 2).

Future planning areas

One key role of the Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan is to prioritise where further future planning is required. The Area Plan Framework (Map 2) shows the specific areas for future planning in the area, while desired outcomes are set out in Tables 5-8. Two types of future planning areas and their degree of priority are outlined below:

1. Further Detailed Planning Areas:

There are areas that need more detailed planning work, such as precinct or structure planning process. This will involve further engagement with the local community.

The Auckland Plan highlights the Greenfield Area for Investigation in and around Silverdale for future development as possible residential and/or business land. Further work will determine the extent to which Silverdale grows and will re-evaluate the Metropolitan Urban Limit (M.U.L).

2. Key Sites: 

There are large sites near town centres that, when developed in an integrated and comprehensive way, may enhance local social, cultural, environmental and economic vitality. Council will engage with site owners to facilitate the redevelopment of these sites.

Staging and timing

The Prioritisation Plan (Map 6) shows funded and unfunded initiatives and infrastructure improvements over the next 10 years. The Area Plan proposes a range of new housing opportunities so that people can continue to have options for safe and affordable housing and jobs.

These opportunities are set out under Table 3 and Table 4 of the Area Plan Framework section. This section focuses on providing family houses, attached town houses, apartments and terraced housing (up to 3 storeys) close to parks, schools, community amenities including public transport. Some is also provided for in town and local centres. 

However, redevelopment can only take place if physical and social infrastructure can accommodate the new growth. Some infrastructure upgrades will be needed; for example, in the East Coast Bays some areas already sustain flooding and this needs to be addressed before new housing developments are approved.

Mixed uses

The four mixed use zones identified in the Area Plan Framework (Map 2) provide a range and choice of commercial, residential and business opportunities clustered together in town centres and local centres. They are usually located on the edge of centres and have easy access to public transport links. Start-up businesses and small-scale enterprises are attracted to mixed-use areas because of lower land cost and the opportunity for expansion. The Browns Bay, Ōrewa, Silverdale and Whangaparāoa town centres are expected to be the focus for mixed-use activities as well as some local centres along key transport routes.

Local centres such as Windsor Park, Torbay, and Gulf Harbour should have a variety of shops and commercial services, to provide for needs of neighbouring communities. 

Tables 3, 5 and 6 set out the expected land uses and built forms (current and future) in the town centres and local centres of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. These land uses and their built form will support more people and jobs while keeping the local character and environmental and amenity values.

Table 3 the four mixed-use zones are:

  1. Town Centre (4 storey max)

Four town centres in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area are Browns Bay, Ōrewa, Silverdale and Whangaparāoa. All need further precinct planning, based on best-practice urban design and environmental safety principles. Town Centres have good public transport links and include mixed-use business zones that provide high quality employment and housing opportunities. New buildings are restricted to 4 storeys.

  1. Local Centre (3 storey max)

 

The six local centres are Mairangi Bay, Windsor Park, Torbay, Northcross, Long Bay and Gulf Harbour. Some centres link closely to each other and to the town centres. Local centres provide community services, convenience shops and small businesses, with links to public transport. Large format retail is discouraged. New buildings are restricted 3 storeys.

  1. Mixed-Use

 

Mixed-use areas include a range and choice of commercial, residential and business opportunities clustered together, usually located on the edge of centres. There is convenient public transport in the area. Activities include commercial and light industry. Residential activities are not permitted at the ground level.

  1. Neighbourhood Centres

 

The four main neighbourhood centres are in Red Beach, Manly, Rothesay Bay and Campbells Bay. As shopping strips that serve the immediate neighbourhood they include corner dairies takeaways and other small commercial businesses. Height is generally in keeping with surrounding homes.

 

Living Environments

The four living environments identified in the Area Plan Framework (Map 2) will provide a range and choice of residential neighbourhoods. The living environments will also need to meet outcomes of the Auckland Plan and respond to the character of these neighbourhoods. The core expectation is for quality housing that meets for residents’ needs while reflecting existing housing types within the area.

The Area Plan Framework identifies specific areas (Map 2) for moderate change to include 2-storey apartments and terraces. All new development will need to meet specific site and building design guidelines.  

Tables 4 to Table 8 set out the expected living environment outcomes (current and future) in the town centres, local centres, neighbourhood centres and coastal villages of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

Table 4, the four living zones are:

  1. Large Lot Residential

 

Single and two storey houses, located on large lots up to 4000m2  on land that is subject to physical limitations, or high landscape amenity, or in areas without town sewerage services.

  1. Single House

 

Single and two storeyed houses on steeper land or in areas where there will be little growth. Trees, lawn and gardens provide traditional amenity.

Each site will have one house, but that house may be divided internally to accommodate more than one household.

  1. Mixed Housing

 

A range of section sizes and building types will be possible in areas earmarked for moderate change. Buildings will generally be up to 2 storeys and include detached, semi-detached, and attached houses, and town houses and units, depending on site and design criteria.

Terraced housing is only suitable on sites larger than 2000m2 and located near town, local and neighbourhood centres, community amenities and public transport.

  1. Terraced Housing and Apartments (3 storey max)

Located around town and local centres, and specifically situated around some schools and larger parks and on some north-facing ridgelines with easy access to frequent public transport.

There will be some areas of apartments and terraced housing of up to 3 storeys. New buildings must meet specific site and design criteria.

Hibiscus and Bays Town Centres, Local Centres and Neighbourhood Centres

How the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area grows must be balanced by local aspirations and the particular values identified in each town centre, local centre or neighbourhood centre.

The Area Plan Framework (Map 2) outlines the land-use types for specific town centres, local centres and neighbourhood centres in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

The form and scale of change for each centre will be guided by the specific desired outcomes below in Tables 5 to Table 8.

Town Centres

The Hibiscus and Bays town centres fall into two types:

-          Coastal – Browns Bay and Ōrewa

-          Inland Hills – Silverdale and Whangaparāoa

The specific nature of local context, character and risk issues require a different planning approach. This approach aims to meet the outcomes set out in the Auckland Plan while providing high quality employment and housing options (see Table 5).

Browns Bay, Ōrewa, Silverdale, and Whangaparāoa all need further precinct planning (as shown on Map 2). This planning should be based on best practice urban design and environmental safety principles. These town centres have good public transport links and include mixed-use business zones that provide high-quality jobs and business opportunities.

Table 5: Hibiscus and Bays Town Centres and their specific desired outcomes 

AREA

ENVISAGED OUTCOMES

Silverdale Town Centre

The innovative business, services and employment hub of the Hibiscus Coast

·        Confirmed as an Auckland Plan Transformation Area, Silverdale adjoins a greenfield area for investigation, where it is anticipated that some further growth could occur west of State Highway 1.

·        Further development to the south-east of Silverdale is not encouraged due to productive, yet unstable soils, steep topography and potential degradation of the Weiti and Ōkura River Catchments.

·        Existing and planned land uses are well integrated, particularly between Silverdale Village, the large format retail centres, business and employment land and the transport hubs.

·        The Hibiscus Coast Highway is downgraded to an arterial road with improved links and street amenity to encourage more cycling and walking activity.

·        The village becomes a destination that is easy to walk to and around with improved connections between the shops in Silverdale Street through to the Weiti River and Foundry Road businesses. Some rezoning of business land would encourage a wider range of jobs and services.

·        The condition of the upper catchment of the Weiti River is improved by a number of measures, including deterring heavy industrial activities on land adjacent to the river.

·        East Coast Road extends over Hibiscus Coast Road and the Weiti River to connect with Curley Avenue.

 

Silverdale Living Areas

 

·        New residential and business development in Millwater and Silverdale is designed to a high standard.

·        Mixed-use activities are encouraged within Silverdale Village, with some apartments up to four storeys, set back from the existing heritage character shops that front the village streets.  The outlook over the Weiti River is maximised.

·        Millwater continues to develop in line with approved zoning.

Whangaparāoa Town Centre

A family and community hub

·        Connections between Arkles Bay, Whangaparāoa Town Centre and Stanmore Bay are improved, strengthening the community services and retail hub in the town centre with a clear identity.

·        The range of living environments (of up to four storeys) in and immediately around the town centre enables improved retail diversity and the town centre’s viability.

·        Community services and amenities (in a central hub) are enhanced, as are the linkages between services, schools, recreational facilities and public transport.

Whangaparāoa Living Areas

 

·        Due to the variable and steep terrain, the residential area retains its mostly single and 2-storey detached houses.

·        Walkway, open space, school and beach linkages are improved.

Browns Bay Town Centre

The retail and commerce centre of the East Coast Bays

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • The business, retail and professional services sector is enhanced by encouraging:

 

- mixed-use activities around the town centre, such as a new hotel, cinema and plaza,

 

- extended hours of entertainment and services into the evening to create a sense of vibrancy focused on Clyde Road and Beachfront Lane, and                                                                                                                    

- the upgrade of Clyde Road to become a multifunctional street environment with adjoining civic spaces.

 

  • Town centre redevelopment occurs up to four storeys with key sites being as a catalyst for such redevelopment.

 

  • Buildings grade down from four storeys in the town centre to three storeys fronting the beach. Beachfront buildings have clear design controls that encourage outdoor dining.

 

  • Buildings do not unduly shadow the beach or the reserve.

·        Community facilities, civic spaces and connectivity are improved within the town centre and between the centre and Browns Bay Beach.

Browns Bay Living Areas

 

·        Some terraced housing and low-rise apartments (up to 3 storeys) are allowed around the edge of Freyberg Park and near town centre facilities.

·        Beach Road business land is rezoned to mixed-use to improve the entry into the town centre and to foster residential living options.

·        Some terraced housing and low-rise apartments (up to 3 storeys) are encouraged along main bus routes that follow north-facing ridgelines, such as East Coast Road and Carlisle Road.

·        New development around waterways and in flood-prone areas is restricted.

Ōrewa Town Centre

A boutique retail and professional services centre, and recreation launching point

 

 

 

  • The relocation of retail activity to other centres is opportunity for Ōrewa to redefine itself into a more specialised and vibrant town centre.
  • The commercial core of the town centre is developed, with buildings up to four storeys.
  • The design of buildings and civic spaces in the town centre is improved to make it more attractive and accessible.
  • Mixed-use sites (with buildings up to three storeys) are developed along Centreway Road from the Council offices to Florence Avenue.
  • Mixed-use sites (with buildings up to two storeys) are encouraged on the beachfront, opposite the commercial town centre area.
  • Buildings are designed and located so they do not unduly shadow the beach, beach parks and/or reserves.

·        The acquisition of additional land to expand the Ōrewa Beach park is considered as funds allow.

 

Ōrewa Living Areas

 

  • The mixed housing zone applies to residential areas beyond the core and surrounding town centre, with housing up to three storeys.
  • Some terraced housing and apartments (up to three storeys), including around the edge of Victor Eaves Park is encouraged.
  • Design and development guidance is provided to ensure resilience against potential natural hazards.

·        Guidelines for new development up to two storeys along the Ōrewa beachfront are developed to protect and enhance the amenity of the area, maintaining views from other parts of Ōrewa.

Local Centres

The six local centres are Mairangi Bay, Windsor Park, Torbay, Northcross, Long Bay and Gulf Harbour (Table 6). Some centres link closely to each other, such as Mairangi Bay-Windsor Park, Long Bay-Torbay, while others complement town centres. The centres provide community services, convenience shops and small businesses, and have links to public transport. Large format retail is discouraged. New building area limited to three storeys.

Table 6: Hibiscus and Bays Local Centres and their specific desired outcomes 

AREA

ENVISAGED OUTCOMES

Mairangi Bay-Windsor Park

 

  • The roles of each centre are strengthened so that they complement each other by:

 

- encouraging specialty shops and cafes in Mairangi Bay, and

 

-          Improving community services and amenities at Windsor Park.

 

  • Walking connections are improved to the beach and between the two centres.

 

  • Some terraced housing and apartments of up to three storeys are encouraged along Ramsgate Terrace and around part of Mairangi Bay Reserve.

 

  • The beach park is completed and some temporary uses or concessions allowed helping improve amenity and recreation opportunities at Mairangi Bay beach.

·        Connectivity to Windsor Park is improved, linking with the East Coast Road’s high-frequency bus services.

 

 

 

 

Northcross

  • This key transport intersection has enhanced services and amenities, to cater for the needs of the growing communities in Ōtehā Valley and Glenvar.

 

  • Large existing lots in the centre are redeveloped for mixed-use activities that enhance the centre.

·        The seaward-facing ridges of East Coast Bays Road and north-facing Carlisle Road have low-rise apartments and terraces, where they are close to high frequency, public transport and the centre.

 

Long Bay-Torbay

  • The roles of each centre are strengthened so that they complement each other by:

-          encouraging specialty shops and cafes in Long Bay,

-          Improving community services and amenities at Torbay.

  • Walking connections are improved to the beach and between the two centres.

·        Some intensification of Torbay is encouraged but buildings are limited to three storeys.

 

Gulf Harbour

  • The Gulf Harbour centre is revitalised as the gateway to the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park, marine recreation and other eco-tourism opportunities.

 

  • Central amenities and community services are improved to meet the needs of the growing community, and of local and overseas visitors.

·        New buildings are guided by improved urban design requirements to discourage further low quality development.


Neighbourhood Centres

The four main neighbourhood centres are in Red Beach, Manly, Rothesay Bay and Campbells Bay. As shopping strips that serve the immediate neighbourhood, they include corner dairies, takeaways and other small commercial operations. Height is generally in keeping with surrounding homes. Red Beach is the largest neighbourhood centre and may become a local centre as the community grows.

Table 7: Hibiscus and Bays Neighbourhood Centres and their specific desired outcomes 

AREA

ENVISAGED OUTCOMES

Red Beach

 

  • Red Beach shopping centre is revitalised by new mixed-use activities including some low-medium height residential development.

 

  • Apartments and terraced housing (up to 3 storeys) are located along Bay Street between the beachfront and the shops.

 

  • Apartments and terraced or semi-detached housing (up to 3 storeys) are located along Red Beach Road between the school and Hibiscus Coast Road.

 

  • Some low-rise apartments fronting Amorino Park are allowed and improvement of walkway connections to Amorino Drive is encouraged.

 

·        The Pinewoods Holiday Park has historic heritage elements and features that need to be assessed to determine appropriate outcomes.

Manly

  • Manly has a range of interesting business activities that make it an attractive village. Improved connections to the beach are developed to benefit the vitality of the centre.

·        A landmark or public art feature also helps to identify the village as a place rather than transit area en route to the regional park.

Rothesay Bay

  • Located on the top of the hill, views across to Rangitoto and beyond are currently limited. Some new development on both sides of Beach Road will enable better appreciation of this, whilst revitalising the centre.

·        A landmark feature on the junction of Knights Road and Beach Road also helps to identify this neighbourhood centre.

 

Campbells Bay

  • The community has benefited from recently improved access to the beach, but developing a small neighbourhood centre near the church could further enhance a sense of place for residents. The beach and Centennial Park are currently the main hubs for the community.

·        Improved visibility of Centennial Park, an upgrade to the War Memorial avenue of Pohutukawa trees and the promotion of community events will also highlight the presence of the park

 

Coastal Villages

The coastal villages of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area are tranquil seaside settlements. Each has a readily identifiable, highly scenic character, shaped by the surrounding dominant marine and hillside landscape. Stillwater and Ōkura provide safe maritime access for boaties by way of their estuarine river systems, while Waiwera is more directly associated with the beach. 

The Auckland Plan envisages that any change to these coastal villages, will occur in a way that preserves their character and quality natural environment. Limited growth is in all coastal villages. Waiwera will only expand if the centralised sewerage system can be upgraded. There is varying potential for these coastal villages to contribute to the recreational and ecotourism economic activity of the wider Local Board area. Table 8 below lists the four coastal villages in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area (as shown on Map 2) and their specific desired outcomes.

Table 8: Hibiscus and Bays Coastal Villages and their specific desired outcomes 

AREA

ENVISAGED OUTCOMES

Waiwera

 

  • Further precinct planning that enhances Waiwera’s special village character.

 

  • Waiwera’s natural and built features are used to strengthen its relationship with the sea and estuary.

 

  • Waiwera makes the most of its character and geothermal springs resource contributing to the area’s ecotourism attractiveness.

·        An improved wastewater treatment system that provides for some limited growth and resilience against natural hazards is investigated.

Ōkura

 

  • Little growth is anticipated and Ōkura remains a discrete, coastal village, separate from the Long Bay development.

·        Equestrian activities continue as a key feature of the surrounding area and the walking network is enhanced by the Crimson Walkway.

Stillwater

  • Stillwater remains a discrete, coastal village.

 

  • Little growth is anticipated, but more amenities are needed over time as people access the water, moor their boats or pass through Stillwater on Te Araroa Walkway.

 

·        If Penlink is constructed, its design and construction should be sympathetic to the ecology and amenity of the area and include pedestrian and cycling links.

 

Weiti Village

  • Weiti Village will be made up of three different-sized residential clusters surrounded by forestry and farmland.

 

  • Some reserves have been covenanted and recreational tracks and facilities for walking, mountain biking and horse riding will be provided.

 

·        A proposed Conservation Institute and Gardens could provide ecological training and education opportunities for young people.

Natural, Heritage and Character Outcomes

This section identifies six outcomes needed to support and improve the natural and built environment of the Hibiscus and Bay Local Board area. These outcomes will help to improve community well-being and attract visitors and investment to the area. This section focuses on the desired landscape, character and heritage outcomes for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Area from now until 2042 and what it will take to achieve those outcomes. Map 3 spatially illustrates how the Natural, Heritage and Character outcomes, below, fit within the Hibiscus and Bays local board area.

OUTCOME 1The highly appreciated rural, natural, marine and coastal landscapes of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area are recognised and enhanced as the area’s point of difference.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

 

OUTCOME 2 – The Hibiscus and Bays’ coastal and marine ecosystems and estuarine areas are protected, restored and enhanced.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

 

OUTCOME 3 – All land and freshwater ecosystems are protected, maintained and enhanced to achieve a connected network that supports wildlife habitats.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

OUTCOME 4 – Each town centre grows sustainably and has a point of difference, based on its specific local character and setting, while offering a mix of housing and employment opportunities.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

 

OUTCOME 5 – Suburban and rural areas are distinctive, attractive and connected, offering a variety of lifestyle options and recreational spaces that contribute to high quality living and a strong sense of community and place.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

OUTCOME 6 – Historic heritage places and culturally significant landscapes are identified, protected and celebrated.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

Economic and Community Development Outcomes

This section identifies six outcomes needed to support improved living conditions and local job prospects for residents in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area, today and into the future. It outlines the desired social and economic outcomes sought for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area until 2042 and what it will take to achieve those outcomes. Map 4 spatially illustrates how the Economic and Community Development outcomes, below, fit within the Hibiscus and Bays local board area.

OUTCOME 1 – Ecotourism and other innovative rural and maritime economy initiatives area promoted, maximising the economic potential of the natural environment in the Hibiscus and Bays area.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

 

OUTCOME 2 – Facilities offering trade skills development and tertiary training are readily available and accessible to local young people within existing and proposed business zones.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

 

OUTCOME 3 – The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area is business-friendly and prosperous, offering a variety of economic development opportunities.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

 

OUTCOME 4 – The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area offers a variety of attractive centres that foster local economic, social, recreational and cultural activities, while celebrating the area’s unique coastal and natural environment.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

OUTCOME 5 – The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area has a range of urban environments that provide for the needs of people of all ages and abilities.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

 

OUTCOME 6 – The re-occupation of tribal rohe (land) and the well-being of the Māori community are provided through improved access to social and cultural infrastructure while supporting Mana Whenua to formally exercise their kaitiakitanga and achieve Treaty Settlement outcomes.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

-          Implementing shared management arrangements with Mana Whenua including Tiritiri Matangi, wāhi tapu and other sites of significance to Māori.

-          Implementing formal engagement frameworks/protocols that seek to strengthen Mana Whenua relationships with the Local Board, Council and CCOs.

-          Provide for partnerships and effective engagement with Mana Whenua on local environmental initiatives and support the replenishment of kaimoana sites.

-          supporting the establishment of Mana Whenua Marae and papakāinga

-          starting with effective engagement, provide for private and public sector partnerships with Mana Whenua on key infrastructure, tourism, aquaculture and development initiatives including the Hibiscus Coast Gateway project

-          Providing access to the local housing market by promoting affordable housing provision.

-          Working in partnership with Treaty Settlement Collectives to realise their Treaty Settlement Outcomes by using a range of regulatory and non-regulatory methods.

Transport and Network Infrastructure Outcomes

This section identifies five outcomes needed to help provide improved transport and infrastructure within the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. It focuses on the desired transport and infrastructure outcomes for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. Of particular note is how those outcomes relate to public transport, walking and cycling amenities, and network infrastructure (such as wastewater, stormwater and broadband).

This section outlines the relevant outcomes for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area until 2042, and what it will take to achieve those outcomes. Map 5 spatially illustrates how the Transport and Infrastructure outcomes, below, fit within the Hibiscus and Bays local board area.

OUTCOME 1 – Business opportunities are unlocked by improving transport connections and public transport services.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

 

OUTCOME 2 – Improved local connections through local bus services that provide for the needs of the local community with particular focus on east-west movements and connecting communities to employment areas.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

 

OUTCOME 3 – Greater inter-modal transport integration to provide more efficient transport networks and greater travel choice.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

 

OUTCOME 4 –  Existing and new infrastructure needed in new development areas can adapt and is resilient to the pressures of population growth, urban intensification and climate change, while protecting and enhancing natural freshwater and coastal systems.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

 

OUTCOME 5 – The infrastructure network in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area is resilient, sustainable and cost effective.

What steps will support achieving this outcome?

Implementation and prioritisation plan

This draft Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan offers a vision and outcomes for the next 30 years. This section focuses on those key actions needed to achieve the outcomes identified within each theme for the next 10 years. These actions have been mapped (Map 6) and listed in a schedule (see Tables 9A to Table 9D).

The next page highlights the key priorities that will make the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area a great place to live, work and play over the next 30 years, and which are needed to deliver the key moves set out in the Area Plan.

The 10-year Prioritisation Schedule (Tables 9A to Table 9D) should be read with the Prioritisation Plan map. Together they provide a list of priorities for the next 10 years, including area-wide strategies, policies, programmes and projects. The priorities will help with putting the Auckland Plan into action, inform the LTP, and be reviewed as part of Council’s Annual Implementation Update.

The 10-year Prioritisation Plan also identifies when changes should be made to existing zoning through the Unitary Plan so the Development Strategy can be put in place successfully over the next 10 years. The objectives, policies and rules of the Unitary Plan help to give clarity and certainty. This will help to achieve the outcomes and aspirations associated with changes to existing zoning. The Plan also identifies key infrastructure and land-use types that need investment to support the desired outcomes. Due to current infrastructure constraints, it is expected that much of the area north of Long Bay will maintain existing zonings. Any rezoning in the first 10 years, under the draft Unitary Plan, will take place mainly in the East Coast Bays and by way of some plan changes already underway.

Yet redevelopment can only take place if physical and social infrastructure can accommodate the new growth. Some infrastructure will need to be upgraded; for example, the regular flooding in some areas of the East Coast Bays must be addressed before approving any new housing.

While area plans operate at a Local Board scale, some areas may need more detailed precinct or structure planning before any changes is made to the Unitary Plan. The Prioritisation Plan identifies when more detailed planning is needed. Precinct planning in Browns Bay, Ōrewa and Silverdale is a priority.

Map 6 shows the priority of projects and initiatives over the next 10 years. The map is coded with colors and numbers that can be matched to descriptions of items in the 10-Year Prioritisation Schedule. Projects are either funded (green), unfunded (red) or eligible for funding from Council-wide budgets (orange).

Key priorities

In response to the key moves identified for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area, there are eight priorities vital to delivering, the outcomes envisaged within this Area Plan:

10-year prioritisation schedule

Tables 9A-9D reflect current thinking on the critical projects, priorities and actions considered necessary to achieve the desired outcomes of the Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan in the first ten years. The content of the 10-year Prioritisation Schedule is divided into four tables. The tick in planning/timing box indicates in which year period the project and initiative is proposed to be action.


Table 9A: Further Planning required – this table below outlines where further planning is required by Auckland Council at a detailed level (presently unfunded).

 

PROJECT/ INITIATIVE

PLANNING/TIMING

2012-2015

2016-2022

LOCAL BOARD AREA-WIDE – Undertake pilot affordable housing projects with community organisations, private sector and/or HNZ in Silverdale, Ōrewa, Long Bay, and/or within intensified areas

Ticked

n/a

LOCAL BOARD AREA-WIDE – Establish a Youth Employment Strategy for Silverdale / Ōrewa / Whangaparāoa with economic development agencies, private sector and training providers

Ticked

n/a

TOWN CENTRES – Undertake further detailed planning and prepare precinct plans for town centres in the following order (Browns Bay, Silverdale, Ōrewa and Whangaparāoa) following the adoption of the Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan

Ticked

Ticked

LOCAL CENTRES - Prepare precinct plans for the local centres in the following order (Mairangi Bay, Red Beach, Torbay, Waiwera and Rothesay Bay) following completion of the above precinct plans for town centres

Ticked

Ticked

 

Table 9B: Funded Projects/Initiatives – This table below outlines the funded projects and initiatives as identified in the Council’s Long Term Plan (LTP) June 2012 and the budgets of related organisations/partners.

 

Map Ref

PROJECT/ INITIATIVE

EXPENDITURE

FUNDING STATUS

FUNDING AGENCIES

2012-2015

2016-2022

 

LOCAL BOARD AREA-WIDE

 

Prepare a parks plan for the Local Board area to deliver future parks projects and programmes ensuring the same levels of services across the Local Board area

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Council

 

Identify opportunities for public walkways and cycleways within the Local Board area

Ticked

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Council

 

Support volunteer groups across all parks and reserves to provide maintenance, predator control and other responsibilities

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Council

 

Provide an arts programme that supports the development of local facilities and artists including performing arts

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Council

 

Develop and support a local events programme across the Local Board area

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Council

 

Provide seven-day access to all libraries in the Local Board area

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Council

 

Provide effective community development services in the Local Board area

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Council

 

Provide opportunities for employment for youth including the Mayor’s Taskforce for Jobs initiative

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Council / Private Sector

F 1

Improve boat ramp, launching and mooring facilities in the Local Board Area

Ticked

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Council

 

Environmental Resilience from Natural Hazards, including Auckland-wide Flood Alleviation Programme

Ticked

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Council

F 2

Complete the Civil Defence Emergency Management Community Response Plans for the Local Board area by 2012, with the exception of Weiti/Okura to be completed by July 2016

Ticked

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Council

F 3

Complete Stormwater Catchment Management Planning (SCMP) in Mairangi, Taiorahi, Taiaotea, Deep Creek and Awaruku in the next three years

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Council

 

Roll out Ultra Fast Broadband:

-    Government funded $1.5 billion investment and initiated in September 2009

-    The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Area is part of the Albany Ward where the UFB rollout is to commence after 2014 (TBC)

Ticked

Ticked

Funded

Central Government

 

Roll out Rural Broadband Initiative to rural communities, households and businesses (e.g. Silverdale, Redvale, Okura, Stillwater, Army Bay, Waiwera)

Ticked

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Council

 

Implement the North Auckland and Northland Grid Upgrade to reinforce transmission capacity to the North Shore and Northland region

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Transpower

F 4

Construction the second North Harbour watermain to provide network efficiency and growth and meets customer charter requirements

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Watercare

F 5

Upgrade the Rosedale Wastewater Treatment Plant to maintain network integrity and performance

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Watercare

F 6

Upgrade the Army Bay Wastewater Treatment Plant to address outfall capacity and quality issues

n/a

Ticked

Funded

Watercare

 

Upgrade North Shore trunk sewer to reduce wet weather overflows

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Watercare

 

Initiate the East Coast Road Bus Priority project

n/a

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Transport

F 7

Construct the first stages of Penlink:   

-          East Coast Road re-alignment

-          Redvale Interchange

-          Toll Road

Encourage Penlink to be built earlier than currently planned in RLTP

n/a

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Transport

F 8

Construction of Northern Busway Extension Stations at Silverdale, Albany and possibly Greville Road

 

n/a

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Transport / NZTA

F 9

Northern Busway Extension Stage 1: (Construct a dedicated busway from Constellation Drive to the Oteha Valley Road Interchange)

n/a

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Transport

F 10

Implement roading improvements and upgrades:

a.      East Coast Road / Spencer Road intersection improvements

b.      Browns Bay Road / East Coast Road

c.      Inverness / Arran Road to Browns Bay Road corridor

d.      Ashley Avenue Upgrade

e.      East Coast Road / Glenvar Road and Lonely Track Road Intersections upgrade

f.        Okura Road / Vaughans Road upgrade

g.      Glenvar Road / Ridge Road

h.      East Coast Road widening

i.        East Coast Road / Forrest Hill intersection

j.         Develop East Coast Road extension to Curley Road, Silverdale

n/a

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Transport

 

BROWNS BAY

F 11

Acquire land and develop Second Phoenix Plaza

Ticked

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Council

 

LONG BAY

 

Implement the Long Bay Structure Plan including the monitoring of the development through each stage. Continue to work with developers and residents to ensure that the structure plan leads to the long-term protection of Long Bay

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Council / Developers

F 12

Construct outdoor artificial surface at Ashley Reserve

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Council

F 13

Long Bay Reserve and walkways development – include funding for engagement with Mana Whenua in regard to cultural heritage elements

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Council

 

 

 

ŌREWA

F 14

Upgrade town streetscape and town entrance landscaping

Ticked

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Council

F 15

Extend the Estuary Arts Centre

Ticked

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Council

 

SILVERDALE

F 16

Renovate and redevelop Stoney Homestead for a future community facility and renew the Silverdale Hall

Ticked

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Council

F 17

Develop Metropark East  including Metropark Sports Fields and Skatepark

Ticked

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Council

F 18

Construct the Silverdale Park and Ride / Hibiscus Coast Busway Station Project

 

 

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Transport / NZTA

F 19

Construct the Silverdale Town Centre bus to bus on road interchange

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Transport

 

Review Hibiscus Coast Highway Corridor Management Plan

 

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Transport

 

STILLWATER

F 20

Build a new hall for the Stillwater community

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Council

 

TORBAY

F 21

Acquire land and develop Torbay Plaza

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Council

 

WEITI

F 22

Investigate the protection and enhancement of the Weiti River including the clearing of the Weiti River channel to improve access

Ticked

n/a

Funded

Auckland Council

 

WHANGAPARĀOA

F 23

Continue the extension and upgrade of the Stanmore Bay Leisure Centre

Ticked

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Council

F 24

Continue the Whangaparāoa Road widening (between Hibiscus Coast Highway to Red Beach)

Ticked

Ticked

Funded

Auckland Transport / NZTA




Table 9C: Projects/Initiatives Eligible for Funding from Region-wide Budgets –  This table below, outlines projects and initiatives that could be fully or partially funded through annual region-wide budgets as identified in the council’s LTP (June 2012) and the budgets of related organisations/partners.

 

Map Ref

PROJECT

EXPENDITURE

FUNDING STATUS

FUNDING AGENCIES

2012-2015

2016-2022

 

LOCAL BOARD AREA-WIDE

E 30

Community Development and Services Upgrades:

Ōrewa: - Library Upgrade; Centrestage Theatre; community centre renewals;

Browns Bay: - Youth development services upgrade (possibly Youth Centre);

Mairangi Bay: - Support to Mairangi Bay Art Centre:

Long Bay: - Community Hub and Youth Centre (new) – library (new);

Waiwera: - Upgrade community facilities, provide new if required.  (All upgrades and new facilities will be informed by Māori Urban Design Principles)

Ticked

n/a

Possible funding from: Regional /Local Community Services, Regional/ Local Library Services, Regional/Local Arts, Culture and Events Services

Auckland Council / Community sector

 

Develop a Community Facilities Strategy that provides direction on provision, development and management of community facilities (including upgrades of existing facilities and shared-use of private facilities).

Ticked

n/a

Possible funding from: Regional /Local Community Services

Auckland Council

 

Develop a Heritage Strategy for the Local Board Area

Ticked

n/a

Possible funding: Cultural and Built Heritage

Auckland Council

 

Support existing BID programmes in the following areas: Mairangi Bay, Browns Bay, Torbay and Ōrewa; and, develop new BID programmes for Silverdale and Whangaparāoa from 2015

Ticked

Ticked

Possible funding from: Local economic development

Auckland Council

E 31

Extend the Regional Cycle Network along Glenvar Road and East Coast Road, and around Ōrewa, Silverdale North, Red Beach, Whangaparāoa Road and Gulf Harbour

Ticked

Ticked

Possible funding from: Parks or Transport

Auckland Transport

 

CAMPBELLS BAY

E 32

Work with the Centennial Park Bush Society on the future management of the Centennial Park

Ticked

Ticked

Possible funding: Local Parks Services

Auckland Transport

 

LONG BAY

E 33

Continue the development of reserves in Long Bay as part of ongoing residential development

Ticked

Ticked

Possible funding: Development Contribution

Developers /  Auckland Council

 


Table 9D: Aspirational Projects/Initiatives – listed in the table below are not currently funded but are listed as aspirational actions for the future.

Map Ref

PROJECT/ INITIATIVE

 

LOCAL BOARD AREA-WIDE

 

§         Upgrade or re-develop civic spaces within town centres and create new civic spaces for centres lacking these

 

§         Identify opportunities for enhancing community, social and recreational activity along coastal edges

U 40

§         Investigate additional tertiary education and training facilities at Silverdale/Ōrewa/Whangaparāoa

 

§         Provide adequate artificial surface for sports fields in the Local Board area

 

§         Review and implement the boat ramps study across the Local Board area

U 41

§         Provide community led planning initiatives for Stillwater and Waiwera to enable the communities to be part of developing a vision for their neighbourhoods and then partnering with the Local Board and Council to deliver the agreed vision

U 42

§         Develop green walkways and cycleways aligning with Te Araroa Walkway Plan

U 43

§         Plan for and develop the coastal walkway including Crimson Walkway

U 44

§         Maintain and manage urban beach areas in the Local Board Area. Improve the Ōrewa Beachfront by developing a Long Term Beach Management Plan including a holistic beach solution and immediate sand re-nourishment on the beach

 

§         Plan and implement a Economic Development and Events Strategy

U 45

§         Develop a Strategy for Ecotourism for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board focusing on Tiritiri Matangi Island, Shakespear/Long Bay, Waiwera

U 46

§         Develop the North-West Wildlink: strategic and detailed planning, liaison with landowners/communities to implement protection/restoration programme and raising associated awareness

U 47

§         Undertake ecological assessment and establish an implementation plan to improve and maintain the environmental quality of estuaries and upper catchments in the following estuaries: Waiwera, Ōrewa and Weiti

 

§         Develop an Ecological Assessment and identify potential new areas for protection by covenants, conservation zoning etc

U 48

§         Develop Corridor Landscape Management Plans for: East Coast Road; Hibiscus Coast Highway; Whangaparāoa Road Highway; Penlink, Grand Drive and Browns Bay Road

 

§         Advocate for free toll-calling for the former Rodney District

 

§         Ensure the provision of stormwater infrastructure to accommodate extra loads from proposed intensification of housing and the reduced impervious surfaces

 

§         Encourage a programme to progressively underground the power lines within the Local Board area

 

§         Implement a programme of initiating Warning systems in place for Civil Defence emergencies including Tsunamis

 

§         Develop co-governance/co-management framework with iwi to integrate Māori  values into environmental management frameworks

 

§         Carry out priority investigation on sites/areas of cultural significance to Māori

 

§         Investigate cultural tourism projects (e.g. Waka Taua, heritage trails)

 

BROWNS BAY

U 49

§         Establish a free WIFI centre at Browns Bay

U 50

§         Investigate ferry and terminal facilities at Browns Bay

 

MAIRANGI BAY

U 51

§         Complete the development and implementation of the Mairangi Bay Reserve Plan

 

ŌREWA

U 52

§         Implement Ōrewa Boulevard stages 2 and 3

 

SILVERDALE

U 53

§         Establish a new library at Silverdale

U 54

§         Develop a Community Hub and Youth Centre at Silverdale

U 55

§         Investigate and establish 24hr Accident and Emergency Centre in Silverdale

U 56

§         Support the development of a marae at Silverdale/Wainui

U 57

§         Construct an amphitheatre for music and other events in the Metropark West

 

WAIWERA

U 58

§         Investigate the decommissioning Waiwera Wastewater Treatment Plant and connecting to the Army Bay Wastewater Treatment

 

WHANGAPARĀOA / GULF HARBOUR

U 59

§         Protect key reserve areas, such as parts of the Archer Block and the Hammerhead at Gulf Harbour and acquire additional reserve space for the growing communities

U 60

§         Widening of Whangaparāoa Road between Arklow Lane to Ladies Miles as part of proposed Penlink Project

U 61

§         Investigate a ferry terminal and associated facilities at Arkles Bay

U 62

§         Establish a family centre and possibly youth centre at Whangaparāoa

Glossary-papakupu

Below is a list of definitions for terms used in the Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan

affordable housing

The ability of a household to rent or buy a home, and where no more than 30 per cent of the household gross income is spent on housing costs. (For a detailed explanation, see pages 269 and 278 of the Auckland Plan 2012).

amenity or amenity value

The qualities of a place that make it pleasant and attractive to individuals and communities.

Auckland Plan

The Auckland Plan is a comprehensive long-term (30-year) spatial strategy that outlines Auckland’s future growth and development and includes social, economic, environmental and cultural objectives. (For a detailed explanation, see Pages 10–11 of the Auckland Plan 2012).

Auckland Transport

A Council Controlled Organisation of Auckland Council that maintains and manages Auckland’s transport networks (except state highways) – from roads and footpaths to traffic signals, rail and buses.

built character

The appearance, qualities and combination of aspects in or of the urban environment, including buildings and structures that help to give a place a distinct identity.

built form

All buildings and structures.

Business Improvement District (BID)

A body that represents local businesses and manages and co-ordinates funding to improve local business areas and centres.

centre

A focal point for a surrounding neighbourhood or area that contains a mix of activities or functions (such as shops, businesses, cafés, libraries, government services, and public transport). Generally has more intensive land use and taller buildings than the surrounding area it serves. (For a more detailed explanation, see Pages 253–54 of the Auckland Plan 2012).

character

A term that describes the look, qualities and mix of attributes of an area, place, street or building that helps to give it a distinct identity.

co-governance

A joint leadership approach of two or more bodies that work together to oversee and decide on a process, project or plan.

co-management

A joint responsibility and/or partnership to manage a project or place.

connectivity

The ease by which people or vehicles can move from one place to another place.

Corridor Management Plan

A plan that aligns transport with neighbouring land uses along and aspirations for a road corridor.

Council Controlled Organisation (CCO)

An administration body, accountable to Auckland Council, that focuses on delivering and managing a specific service, activity or area. CCOs are independent of the Council’s operations to where they sometimes have their own governance structure.

ecosystem

Interactions and relationships between all living things, such as plants, animals and microorganisms in the environment.

ecotourism

Tourism that involves activities or experiences in the natural environment.

employment node

Areas where jobs are concentrated, often in town centres or on business land.

engagement

In a process, oral and written communication and interaction between persons and groups who can influence change.

environments

Primary land uses (zones) in broad categories of living, business, mixed use, rural, public open space and special purpose (to be implemented by the Unitary Plan through objectives, policies, rules and zones).

frequent transit network

A road, corridor or route with regular public transport services (such as a bus service every 15 minutes) that forms part of the quality transit and regional transit networks, as defined on page 379 of the Auckland Plan 2012.

green buffer

A strip of vegetated land that acts as a barrier between two differing land uses or transport networks. Helps to manage the impacts of these neighbouring activities (such as between heavy industrial use and residential use).

green economy

An environmentally sustainable approach that businesses can apply to their products and services to lead to economic benefit.

green walkway

Natural, vegetated pathways and links that provide pedestrian or cycle access.

greenbelt

A continuous strip of land, often made up of recreational parks, farmland, vegetated corridors or uncultivated land, that defines and limits the boundaries of urban growth.

heritage

The legacy of tangible physical resources and intangible attributes that are inherited from past generations, to include historic heritage, natural heritage, taonga tuku iho (heirlooms) and other forms of heritage such as works of art, artifacts, beliefs, traditions, language and knowledge.

Hibiscus Coast Gateway

A symbolic gateway to the Hibiscus Coast that provides for recreation and entertainment activities and specialist retail and related activities focused on land to the southeast of the northern motorway and the Hibiscus Coast Highway.

historic character area

Areas with historical relevance that should be conserved or improved. Areas include older, established suburbs, town centres, settlements; rural, institutional, maritime, commercial and industrial areas; or settlements of special architectural or other heritage value. Historical relevance may come from buildings of a particular historical time, mature indigenous vegetation, and the relationship of built form to natural landscapes, or the use of traditional materials and design.

historic heritage

“Historic heritage—

(a)   means those natural and physical resources that contribute to an understanding and appreciation of New Zealand’s history and cultures, deriving from any of the following qualities:

§         archaeological:

§         architectural:

§         cultural:

§         historic:

§         scientific:

§         technological;

(b)   and includes

§         historic sites, structures, places, and areas; and

§         archaeological sites; and

§         sites of significance to Māori, including wāhi tapu; and

§         surroundings associated with the natural and physical resources.”

(Definition from the Resource Management Act 1991 s2).

Industrial Management Area

A defined area where the effects of industrial activities are managed, and often sited on the edge of industrial or business land (identified within Natural, Heritage and Character map “manage industrial impacts”).

infrastructure

The fixed and long-lived structures that support daily life, such as water supply, roads and community buildings (see also ‘social infrastructure’ and ‘network infrastructure’ in this glossary).

kaitiaki

The Māori concept of guardianship for the sky, the sea, and the land. A kaitiaki is a guardian.

kaitiakitanga

The process and practices by which the tangata whenua of an area protect and look after the natural and physical resources of an environment in line with tikanga Māori (includes the ethic of stewardship).

Local Board Plan

A plan that describes the local community’s hopes and preferences for an area and the priorities of a Local Board area for the next three years and beyond, to include proposed projects, programmes and services.

Long Term Plan

A 10-year plan prepared under the Local Government Act 2002 that has programmes for Council’s priorities, activities and operating and capital expenditure.

Mana Whenua

Iwi, the people of the land who have mana or authority – their historical, cultural and genealogical heritage are attached to the land and sea.

Marine Protected Area

Areas of the marine environment protected for the maintenance and/or recovery of biological diversity and ecosystems.

Mataawaka

Māori whose tūrangawaewae is outside the Auckland region.

Metropolitan Urban Limit (M.U.L)

A boundary within which to contain Auckland’s urban development.

multi-modal corridor

A route for people to use that includes various transport methods, including public transport, cycleways and walkways.

natural character

Qualities and values of the environment that help to give an area or a site a distinct identity. Examples include areas of indigenous and exotic vegetation, such as pasture, terrestrial, aquatic and marine habitats; landforms, landscapes, and seascape; and wetlands, lakes, rivers and their margins.

natural hazards risk area

An area identified as being at higher risk from natural hazards (including flooding, earthquakes and coastal erosion) that is being managed to mitigate these types of risk.

natural heritage

Places, items, sites or areas of value that are a result of the natural environment and processes. Includes places with indigenous flora and fauna; terrestrial, marine and freshwater ecosystems and habitats; landscapes, landforms, and geological features; soils; and the natural character of the coastline.

needs assessment

The process of gathering data and information to identify gaps in providing social infrastructure or other services.

network infrastructure

Infrastructure assets and networks that are used to generate, send and distribute energy and fuels, including natural gas and petroleum products; to collect, treat and distribute potable water; to collect, treat and dispose of wastewater and stormwater, and the operation of the telecommunication and radio communication network.

Northern Busway

A physically separated busway with dedicated park-and-ride facilities along the motorway north of Auckland, linking the North Shore with Auckland’s CBD.

North-West Wildlink

A band of important biodiversity habitats that runs from the Hauraki Gulf Islands, in particular Tiritiri Matangi, across the upper reaches of the Waitematā Harbour to the Waitākere Ranges.

Ōkura Policy Area

A specially zoned area that recognises the landscape character and environmental sensitivity of the Ōkura catchment.

Open Space Network Plan

A non-statutory plan that provides direction on how to continue to provide for, manage, develop and manage public parks and open spaces in each Local Board area.

papakāinga

A Māori settlement or village that can include activities associated with residential living, such as a marae complex, gardening, social amenities and economic developments.

Penlink (Peninsular Link)

A roading project that proposes a second access route to the Whangaparāoa Peninsula by providing a direct link between the Whangaparāoa Peninsula (at Stanmore Bay) and the Northern Motorway (at Redvale).

policy

A plan of action or a process that reflects the approach taken or rules adopted by Auckland Council and/or other regulatory agencies.

Regional Walking And Cycling Network

Walking and cycling links developed across Auckland.

resilience

The capacity and ability to recover quickly from difficulties, put up with disturbance, resist damage, and keep form, function and use over time. Applies to built and environmental resilience.

restoration

The act of returning something to a former state, place or condition.

Silverdale Knowledge Economy Zone

A specialist business zone for clean and knowledge-based industries in a high-quality campus with riparian stream and bush vegetation. The zone is a mixed-use centre that includes professional and health services, offices and a limited number of upper-storey residences.

sites of significance to Māori

Areas that are important to Māori, such as wāhi tapu, urupā, and archaeological and heritage areas.

social infrastructure

A broad term for a range of facilities, services and locations delivered by Council, government and community groups to support and sustain the well-being of people and communities. Examples include libraries, schools, parks and community buildings.

Spatial Planning

A form of planning for cities, regions or countries that seeks to provide long-term direction for development and the achievement of social, economic and environmental well-being. Core objectives as set out in the European Regional/Spatial Planning Charter 1983 (Torremolinos Charter) include:

Stormwater Catchment Management Plan (SWCMP)

A plan that identifies issues and proposes solutions for a stormwater catchment, and provides an integrated approach to manage stormwater in a catchment (including areas that might flood, streams and contaminants).

Tangata Whenua

The iwi or hapū that hold Mana Whenua (exercise customary authority) over a particular area.

Silverdale Transformation Area

Council’s transformation programme includes a range of projects and initiatives, which will create a step change and act as a catalyst for private sector redevelopment. Silverdale is one of these areas.

Te Araroa National Walkway

New Zealand’s long-distance walking/tramping route, from Cape Reinga to Bluff.

transformational shift

A key action that is considered to be a major change that lead to a positive outcome for the area.

tribal rohe

A tribal district; the area over which iwi and hapū claim Mana Whenua, including prominent geographical features, mountains, rivers and lakes.

wāhi tapu

A place sacred and important to Māori in the traditional, spiritual, religious, ritual or mythological sense.

water-based recreational activities

A variety of activities such as swimming, boating, fishing and windsurfing that depend on water resources and/or that are based in any water environment, such as sea, harbour, coast or lake. 

water sensitive design

Development design that focuses on reducing the impacts on water and water-based environments.

Disclaimer:

Auckland Council is not liable for anyone or any entity acting in reliance of this area plan or for any error, deficiency or omission in it.